CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Labor market and Economic perspectives on large-scale Migration in Sociology (LEMS)

Dates and location:
Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) of the University of Mannheim on Friday, November 17 and Saturday, November 18, 2017.[1]

Theme:
Labor market and economic sociologists take notice of each other less often than common concerns might suggest. This ignorance is particularly troubling amid the large-scale influx of immigrants and refugees into established economies over the past few years in particular and the past decade in general. Among these changes, issues of employment and emergent economic activities, which both fields focus on, gain in significance and salience. Labor market sociologists demonstrate that unregulated labor markets are neither free nor fair, diminishing hopes for quick integration. A focus on the distribution of relevant worker characteristics over a range of social dimensions such as class, gender, and ethnicity allows labor market sociologists to develop more constructive views of labor market mechanisms. Economic sociologists scrutinize dynamics around the establishment of larger social objects such as industries and “informal economies”, some of which are dominated by immigrant ethnic groups. In more specific settings, economic sociologists have found evidence that ethnic diversity—an obvious consequence of migration—increases the resilience of common market mechanisms. The conference seeks to foster a dialogue between the two views in order to develop conceptual, analytical, and empirical strategies that help us study and understand the forces undergirding the recent developments and their consequences.

Submission:
Name, title, and abstract (250 words)
Deadline: September 10, 2017 (LEMS2017@mzes.uni-mannheim.de)
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Call for Papers: Mini-conference on Intersections of Economic Sociology and Organizations, Occupations and Work

Fellow Travelers on Different Roads: The Intersections of Economic Sociology and Organizations, Occupations, and Work

August 11, 2017
Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University, Montreal

The industrial revolution fundamentally transformed society.  Central to this transformation was the growing role of work, organizations, and markets in daily life. It is no coincidence that the discipline of sociology was founded in this era, and that the study of these institutions continues to be at the core of both the Economic Sociology and Organizations, Occupations, and Work sections.

This mini-conference aims to bring together members of both sections to facilitate dialogue within and across our fields. The event will highlight work that advances research in Economic Sociology and Organizations, Occupations, and Work, using a diverse set of theoretical and methodological approaches.  We invite research that explores core themes from both domains, as well as research that develops the intersections and tensions between the two.  We are especially interested in new work that engages with emerging phenomena and/or uses novel perspectives. We hope that the conference will bring together economic sociologists and scholars of organizations, occupations, and work from across institutional divides, including those in sociology departments, as well as in schools of management, engineering, public policy, and industrial and labor relations.  Thematic sessions will be determined based on submissions.

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Call for Papers: The New Economy ASA Pre-Conference

Call for Papers

The New Economy

ASA pre-conference hosted by the Economic Sociology Section

Economic Sociology Section of the ASA is pleased to announce a one-day conference on The New Economy to be held on August 19, 2016 at the University of Washington, Seattle.

The crises of late-stage capitalism has led to a series of crises, including global threats to sustainability, security and democracy. It has also created technologies and opportunities that are giving rise to new forms of organization, new systems of work, new markets, new global flows of people, new goods and capital, and new institutional and cultural frameworks. These macro-level changes, in turn, result in profound transformations of social life at the microlevel: new social identities, new forms of adaption, and the new sites of struggle and resistance. The city of Seattle is a particularly fertile ground for addressing these concerns, given its rich and important history of innovation, labor movements and its position as one of the fastest growing cities in the U.S.

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