Call for Applications: Arizona Methods Workshops

Please join us for the 9th Annual Arizona Methods Workshops, January 3-5, 2019.

This year we will offer workshops in Propensity Score Techniques, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Qualitative Data Analysis in ATLAS.ti, Team and Grant Management, and R.

Please share with your colleagues and graduate students!  Graduate students can apply for the Scott R. Eliason Award, which covers all but the $50 registration fee (deadline is 10/31).

Website (links to workshop descriptions, instructor bios, award application, & online registration):

https://sociology.arizona.edu/methods

Flyer:

Call for Applications: CASBS Summer Institute on “Organizations and Their Effectiveness”

Fellowship Opportunity

Application portal can be accessed starting November 27, 2018, at
https://applycasbs.stanford.edu/summerapplication/

Summer Institute for Behavioral and Social Scientists
Organizations and Their Effectivness 
July 8 through July 20, 2019

Directors
Robert Gibbons (rgibbons@mit.edu), economics and management, MIT
Woody Powell (woodyp@stanford.edu), education and sociology, Stanford University

ABOUT THE CASBS SUMMER INSTITUTE
The fourth annual CASBS summer institute on Organizations and Their Effectiveness will occur from July 8 through July 20, 2019 at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences on the Stanford University campus. Fifteen fellowships will be awarded to cover tuition, room and board, and travel.

We will begin reviewing completed applications on December 17, 2018. The application portal will remain open until January 14, 2019. Fellowship awards will be announced by email no later than February 22, 2019.

Continue reading “Call for Applications: CASBS Summer Institute on “Organizations and Their Effectiveness””

Congrats to Yuen Yuen Ang, 2018 Zelizer Award for Best Book in Economic Sociology

Congrats to OOW member, Yuen Yuen Ang, who recently received the 2018 Zelizer Award for Best Book in Economic Sociology!

Award Announcement: In How China Escaped the Poverty Trap, Yuen Yuen Ang offers a bold and innovative framework for understanding economic development, one that challenges current wisdom from modernization and institutionalist perspectives.  The later, she argues, are simply too linear, top-down and errantly predicated on inductive modelling from Western contexts that make little sense for the global south.  She founds her alternative in complexity theory; envisioning economic development as a recursive and dynamic process in which state and markets co-evolve through innovation that cannot be prescribed.  Ang both theorizes and demonstrates how this process is bootstrapped using weak institutions at all levels of governance.  Developmental paths are formed through what she terms directed improvisation, the process by which the state sets some clear makers for policy makers at lower levels, but otherwise provides incentives and support to use local knowledge and experimentation.  This allows for necessary variation across the economic landscape and in different industries, the capacity for bureaucrats and entrepreneurs to select novel combinations of strategies, and the pursuit of niche economies that provide for virtuous growth cycles with ramifications for the larger economy.  In a series of richly detailed case studies Ang demonstrates how success was nurtured when goals were initially narrow and institutional transformation broad but gradual, when bureaucrats at all levels were incentivized to become entrepreneurial stakeholders, and when the boogie of corruption is harnessed to build momentum.  She carefully analyzes these dynamics at the macro-, meso- and micro-levels.  Through these case studies Ang additionally examines how the unleashing first of the coastal economies provided for cascading effects on their inland counterparts.  She is also sensitive to how this co-evolutionary process produces systemic problems with respect to the environment and inequality.  To add depth through comparison she also applies her model to disparate cases such as medieval Europe, the antebellum post-depression United States and Nigeria’s Nollywood film industry.  How China Escaped the Poverty Trap truly offers game-changing ideas for the analysis and implementation of socio-economic development and should have a major impact across many social sciences.

Call for Nominations: The Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (SASE) Book Award

SASE invites nominations for its inaugural Book Award for an outstanding scholarly book that breaks new ground in the study of economic behavior and/or its policy implications with regard to societal, institutional, historical, philosophical, psychological, and ethical factors. Eligible books must have a 2017 or 2018 first edition publication date and cannot be edited volumes. Authors are welcome to nominate their own work. To nominate a book, please send a hard copy to all three (3) committee members listed below by January 15, 2019.
Letters of nomination are not required from SASE members. Publishers and non-members who wish to submit a book for consideration must include a nomination letter that states how the book contributes to SASE’s intellectual mission. All books/submissions must be in English. Please direct any inquiries to Chair Mari Sako, sasebookaward@gmail.com.

Message from the Chair

By Emily Barman

Welcome to the new academic year; as the new semester either approaches or has already begun for many of you, ASA begins quickly to seem like a distant and hopefully fond memory.  Before too much time elapses, I want to take this opportunity to provide an overview of where our Section is and some of the decisions we likely face moving forward.

First, to quickly recap our time at the ASA, I want to thank you all for a series of exciting and energetic sessions at this year’s conference in Philadelphia, including those convened by the Program Committee (composed of myself, Tarun Banerjee, Erin Kelly, Ming Leung, Polly Rizova, Klaus Weber) and by the OOW Roundtable organizers (Eric Dahlin, Nicole Denier, and Ken-Hou Lin), and the Chair’s Choice session on “Revisiting Organizations and Power,” as well as the papers presented in other sessions by our members.    Continue reading “Message from the Chair”

A Brief Report on Research in the Sociology of Work

Steven Vallas, Northeastern University

Sociologists studying work, organizations, and economic institutions will already know about Research in the Sociology of Work, sponsored by OOW for several years now. Here’s brief report on recent events. Now using a hybrid model, RSW is open to both general-topic submissions in the field and to papers responding to thematic calls for special issues.

Continue reading “A Brief Report on Research in the Sociology of Work”