Job Posting: Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Arts & Public Policy at Vanderbilt

The Curb Center at Vanderbilt invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Arts & Public Policy as part of the Curb Center at Vanderbilt’s Public Policy program, to begin on August 1, 2020.

The Curb Center at Vanderbilt is a national policy center committed to research and learning that challenge leaders to rethink the role of creative and cultural expression in contemporary society. The successful candidate will work closely with the Associate Director of Public Policy on various arts-related research projects, primarily focused on the educational and career pathways of creative workers. The role provides an opportunity for an early-career academic professional to develop national and international policy research on a broad range of cultural policy issues. The successful applicant will also support the Assistant Director of Creative Enterprise and Public Leadership in the activities of the Creative Campus and Curb Scholars programs. There is no teaching associated with this appointment. Approximately half (50%) of the candidate’s time will be dedicated to their own research and scholarship.

This is a non-faculty, non-tenure track, one-year term appointment, with the possibility of a yearly extension contingent on funding and satisfactory performance. The fellow will join a cohort of other postdoctoral fellows across Vanderbilt University and have access to the professional development support of the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs.

The position is full time and carries a competitive salary, commensurate with the applicant’s experience and qualifications, plus health insurance coverage as specified by Vanderbilt University guidelines. The Postdoctoral Research Fellow’s primary appointment will be in the Department of Sociology, with all funding for the position coming from Curb Center resources.

The successful applicant will have the following qualifications:

  1. A Ph.D. in Sociology or a field relevant to the broad aims of the program (i.e., social sciences, arts, humanities, law, information science, etc.) by start date.
  2. Research expertise relevant to cultural policy, broadly construed (including cultural production and consumption, work and careers, creative cities, etc.).

To apply for the Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, submit the following materials in digital format:

  1. A cover letter expressing interest in the position;
  2. A current curriculum vitae;
  3. A transcript of graduate work (unofficial is acceptable);
  4. Two writing samples;
  5. The names and contact information for three references.

Applications and inquiries should be sent to Kimberly Kane (kimberly.kane@vanderbilt.edu).

Review of applications will begin on February 1, 2020, but applications will be considered until the position is filled.

Vanderbilt University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

Member Publication: Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance

Please check out the following recent publication by OOW members Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely: Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance. 2020. New York: Oxford University Press.

Here is a short description of the book:

Finance is an inescapable part of American life. From how one pursues an education, buys a home, runs a business, or saves for retirement, finance orders the lives of ordinary Americans. And as finance continues to expand, inequality soars.

In Divested, Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely demonstrate why widening inequality cannot be understood without examining the rise of big finance. The growth of the financial sector has dramatically transformed the American economy by redistributing resources from workers and families into the hands of owners, executives, and financial professionals. The average American is now divested from a world driven by the maximization of financial profit.

Lin and Neely provide systematic evidence to document how the ascendance of finance on Wall Street, Main Street, and among households is a fundamental cause of economic inequality. They argue that finance has reshaped the economy in three important ways. First, the financial sector extracts resources from the economy at large without providing economic benefits to those outside the financial services industry. Second, firms in other economic sectors have become increasingly involved in lending and investing, which weakens the demand for labor and the bargaining power of workers. And third, the escalating consumption of financial products by households shifts risks and uncertainties once shouldered by unions, corporations, and governments onto families.

A clear, comprehensive, and convincing account of the forces driving economic inequality in America, Divested warns us that the most damaging consequence of the expanding financial system is not simply recurrent financial crises but a widening social divide between the have and have-nots.

Job Posting: Postdoctoral Researcher at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Principal Investigators Dr. Julien Clement and Dr. Jon Atwell of the Stanford Graduate School of Business seek to fill a position for a postdoctoral researcher. This researcher will collaborate with both Dr. Clement and Dr. Atwell on projects related to organizational structure and organizational adaptation. This is a two-year position assuming academic achievement and service at a level at or above expectations, with annual formal reviews.

The ideal candidate will have a PhD in a social science field, have a strong interest in organizational adaptation and design and have strong technical skills in empirical analysis and programming. They will have the opportunity to use a wide range of methodologies including formal modeling, large group experiments, and empirical analyses using both traditional statistical and machine learning techniques. Depending on the applicant’s interests, the position may involve substantial input on the development of projects and co-authored work with the PIs. The role will also allow for a proportion of time dedicated to publishing the applicant’s own ongoing research projects. It will also involve some work coordinating other research support.

The desired start date of the position is early summer and completion of the PhD degree is required before the appointment starts. If hired, the applicant will be a member of the Organizational Behavior group at Stanford GSB and will be able to participate in group seminars, workshops and informal knowledge sharing. The position comes with health benefits and access to most Stanford resources.

Candidates that have accepted tenure-track positions at another institution with the ability to defer their start date will also be considered.

Qualifications

PhD in a social science or other relevant field Strong programming skills
Strong communication skills

Applications need to include

  • A cover letter describing your interest in and qualifications for this position
  • Up to three writing samples that demonstrate your expertise and fit for the position
  • The names and contact information of up to three letter writers

Application Information

Please upload a single PDF with the above application materials to tinyurl.com/GSB- postdoc. Please title the file with your first and last name (e.g. Sarah-Smith.pdf) Applications will be considered upon submission but to ensure consideration applications must be submitted by February 15th.

Principal Investigators

Dr. Clement studies how the design of an organization affects the way people collaborate. How does an organization’s structure affect how its members form relationships and develop routines? How can it help them adapt these routines when environmental demands change? And when can organizations thrive without any formal structure? Dr. Clement has used a variety of analytical methods to answer these questions (network analysis, agent-based models, big-data analytics) in contexts including the television game-show industry, professional videogaming (e-Sports) and mobile healthcare in Africa. Most recently, he started studying how the deployment of artificial intelligence inside organizations may affect collaboration and learning among their members.

Dr. Atwell studies how groups of individuals communicate and consume social information. At the root of society is the creation of broadly-shared understandings of the relevant social context but many features of the modern social life present potential pitfalls for that creative process. Using simulations, large-group experiments, and natural language processing, Dr. Atwell analyzes how different dynamic social processes produce, distribute and aggregate the information necessary for large groups to create these essential shared understandings. 

OOW Membership Renewal

Hello Everyone,

I just wanted to pass along a message from Melissa Wooten and the OOW membership committee as we wind up 2019 and start looking ahead to 2020.  In addition to renewing your membership, please consider submitting a paper to one of of our ASA sessions. The deadline is January 29th.

Michael Sauder

***

OOW Membership Renewal

Before you set your “out of office” email for the winter break, remember to renew your ASA and OOW membership! This is also a great time of year to consider donating a gift membership. ASA members can gift an ASA membership for students or section memberships for anyone at https://asa.enoah.com

Don’t know what to get that teaching assistant who graded all your papers this semester? Or that colleague who provided  feedback on your manuscript? How about an OOW membership? 

To purchase a gift ASA membership for students:

Once logged into the member portal, please click “Purchase a gift membership for a student” under the Contribute/Give heading. Students 
can be searched by name through the online member database. A new contact record can be created by the member if the student is not found in the database.

Your gift will be redeemable by the recipient for a ASA student membership (or a $52 discount on another membership type). Your gift recipient will receive their gift credit via email immediately after your purchase. Gift memberships are not refundable if unredeemed by the end of the 2020 membership year, September 30, 2020. Gift memberships are not tax deductible. The deadline for a 2020 gift ASA membership for students is July 31, 2020.

To purchase a gift section membership:

Once logged into the member portal, please click “Purchase a gift section membership” under the Contribute/Give heading. Select the section and search for your recipient by name. Section membership requires 2020 ASA membership. Only 2020ASA members who do not already have a membership in that section are eligible to receive a gift. Your recipient will receive an e-mail immediately after your  payment notifying them of the section gift. (Your name will be included in this message). If the recipient declines the gift within 30 days of  receipt, you will receive a refund by mail. Gifts are not tax deductible. The deadline for a 2020 gift section membership additions is July 31, 2020.

Wishing you a restful break,
OOW Membership Committee

Call for Applications: The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

Practice, Process and Issues of Scale in Global Challenges (13-16 July, 2020)

Following on from our highly successful Summer Schools in the last seven years, we are pleased to announce the 2020 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies.

The Workshop takes place from Monday 13 July to Thursday 16 July on the University of Warwick campus, Coventry, UK. The School is programmatically multi-disciplinary and open to a variety of approaches and sensitivities. It is organised by Warwick’s Practice, Process, and Institutions (PPI) Research Programme in collaboration with the International Symposium Series on Process Organization Studies (PROS).

The variable theme of this year’s summer school focuses on the issue of Scale in Global Challenges. An increasing number of scholars is interested in studying global challenges, such as climate change, poverty, health technologies, policy making, etc. Capturing such large-scale phenomena can be a challenge for practice and process scholar:  Should we take a micro or macro lens? Where should we look? How do we connect small scale and large-scale phenomena? How about local actions and global actions? In the summer school, we will advance these discussions in two ways: We will (1) rethink the methods we use to study phenomena of societal importance, and (2) shift from scale as a category of analysis to scale as a category of practice.

This year the school is programmatically aimed at advanced PhDs students and early career scholars who already have substantial experience with process and practice approaches in their research.

Full details for the event, which includes information about the application and registration fees, can be found on our website.

To apply, please submit your application by February 28th via this link

If you have any questions please email Katharina Dittrich.

Call for Papers and Workshop Participants: ASA Methods Section mid-year meeting + Arizona Methods Workshops

ASA Methods Section mid-year meeting + Arizona Methods Workshops, March 20-22, 2020

Please join us for an exciting event co-hosted by the American Sociological Association Methods Section and University of Arizona Sociology. It will be held in Tucson at one of the most beautiful times of the year. Come for the one-day meeting, or the two-day workshops, or both. Register here: https://tinyurl.com/swtqh5d

DAY 1 (March 20): Methods Section meeting

The theme is “Replication & Rigor in Social Science,” broadly defined.

Come share your research! Travel funds for graduate students are available. Submissions accepted through January 15th, 2020: https://tinyurl.com/methods2020

Confirmed participants include:

  • Jeremy Freese (Stanford)
  • Erin Leahey (Arizona)
  • David Melamed (OSU)
  • Jim Moody (Duke)
  • Martín Sánchez-Jankowski (Berkeley)
  • Katherine Stovel (Washington)
  • Corey Abramson (Arizona)

Questions? Contact methods2020@gmail.com

DAYS 2 and 3 (March 21-22): Arizona Methods Workshops

 MORNING WORKSHOPS (SAT-SUN 8:30—Noon)

  • Social Network Analysis, James Moody (Duke)
  • Introduction to Sequence Analysis, Katherine Stovel (Washington)
  • Observing and Analyzing Everyday Behavior, Martín Sánchez-Jankowski (Berkeley)

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS (SAT- SUN 1:30-5pm)

  • Qualitative Data Analysis with ATLAS.ti, Corey M. Abramson (Arizona)
  • Producing Transparent and Reproducible Research, Jeremy Freese (Stanford) 
  • Introduction to R, Jeffrey Oliver and Keaton Wilson (Arizona)

Workshops start at $300 and graduate students can apply for the Scott Eliason Award to cover workshop fees.  For more information visit: https://sociology.arizona.edu/methods

Questions? Contact coreyabramson@email.arizona.edu

Member Publication

Please check out the following recent publication from OOW members Aliya Hamid Rao and Megan Tobias Neely: “What’s Love Got to Do with It? Passion and Inequality in White-Collar Work.” Sociology Compass. Online First.

Abstract:

Emotion has become an increasingly important aspect of work in the 21st century. In this article, we take stock of the extant literature delineating the role of emotions, especially passion as a cultural schema, in white‐collar workplaces. Scholars have covered extensive ground on emotions at work, but the role of passion remains an underexplored yet significant area. Drawing from recent developments in research on white‐collar work, we argue that the passion schema has become a critical marker in the labor market for sorting individuals into occupations, hiring and promotion within organizations, and assigning value to people’s labor. Emergent research suggests that because the expression and perception of passion remain ambiguously defined in the workplace and varies by context, it is pivotal in reproducing social inequalities. In this review, we focus on how privileging passion in the workplace and interpreting it as a measure of aptitude impacts social inequalities by race, gender, and social class. We close by setting an agenda for further research on this topic.