Weber Award

Max Weber Book Award

The Max Weber Award for Distinguished Scholarship is granted for an outstanding contribution to scholarship on organizations, occupations, and/or work in a book published within the last three years (2018, 2019, 2020). A book may be nominated by its author(s), by its publisher, or by any ASA member.

To nominate a book, send (1) a copy of the book, (2) contact information for the nominee (including an email address) to each member of the selection committee at the addresses below and (3) a nomination letter that states how the book contributes to scholarship on organizations, occupations, and/or work. To receive full consideration, nominations must be submitted by March 31, 2021.

Please submit your nomination to each of the members of the 2021 Weber Book Award Committee:

Chair: Tim Bartley
Washington University in St. Louis
bartleyt@wustl.edu
Mailing address:
1127 Edward Terrace
St. Louis, MO 63117

Christine Williams
University of Texas
cwilliams@austin.utexas.edu
Mailing address:
4701 Shoal Creek Blvd
Austin, TX  78756

Marlese Durr
Wright State University
marlese.durr@wright.edu
Mailing address:
122 West McPherson Street
Dayton, Ohio 45405

Dustin Avent-Holt
Augusta University
daventho@augusta.edu
Mailing address:
328 Relative Trail
McDonough, GA 30253


Past Winners:

2020 Winners

Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald, and Dustin Avent-Holt. 2019. Relational Inequalities: An Organizational Approach. New York: Oxford University Press.

Honorable Mention:

Sallaz, Jeffrey. 2019. Lives on the Line: How the Philippines Became the World’s Call Center Capital. New York: Oxford University Press.

2019 Winner

Richard E. Ocejo, Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.  2017. 

2018 Winner

Anju Mary Paul (Yale-NUS College), Multinational Maids: Stepwise Migration in a Global Labor Market. Cambridge University Press.

Honorable Mentions:

John Krinsky and Maud Simonet. Who Cleans the Park? Public Work and Urban Governance in New York City. University of Chicago Press.

Wendy Espeland and Michael Sauder. Engines of Anxiety: Academic
Rankings, Reputation, and Accountability. Russell Sage Foundation.

2017 Winner

Steve Viscelli (University of Pennsylvania), The Big Rig: Trucking and the Decline of the American Dream (University of California Press)

2016 Winner

Lauren Rivera (Northwestern), Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs (Princeton University Press)

2015 Winners

Dan Clawson and Naomi Gerstel (both of University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Unequal Time: Gender, Class, and Family in Employment Schedules (Russell Sage Foundation).

An honorable mention was awarded to Nancy DiTomaso (Rutgers University), for The American Non-Dilemma: Racial Inequality Without Racism (also Russell Sage Foundation).

2014 Winner

Ofer Sharone. 2014. Flawed System/Flawed Self: Job Searching and Unemployment Experiences. University of Chicago Press.

2013 Winner

Elizabeth Popp Berman. 2012. Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

2012 Winner

Kate Kellogg. 2011. Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2011 Winner

Martin Ruef. 2010. The Entrepreneurial Group: Social Identities, Relations, and Collective Action. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

2010 Winner

Frank Dobbin. 2009. Inventing Equal Opportunity. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

2009 Winner

Matthew Desmond. 2007. On the Fireline: Living and Dying with Wildland Firefighters. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2008 Winner

Rakesh Khurana. 2007. From Higher Aims to Hired Hands: The Social Transformation of American Business Schools and the Unfulfilled Promise of Management as a Profession. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

2007 Winner

Nicole C. Raeburn. 2004. Changing Corporate America from Inside Out: Lesbian and Gay Workplace Rights. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

2006 Winner

Jerome Karabel. 2005. The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

2005 Winner

Maria Charles and David Grusky. 2005. Occupational Ghettos: The Worldwide Segregation of Women and Men. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.

2004 Winner

Judy Stephan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin. 2003. Left Out: Reds and America’s Industrial Unions. New York: Cambridge University Press.

2003 Winner

Charles Perrow. 2002. Organizing America: Wealth, Power, and the Origins of Corporate Capitalism. Princeton: Princeton University.

2002 Winner

Glenn R. Carroll and Michael T. Hannan. 2000. The Demography of Corporations and Industries. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

2001 Winner

Richard Scott, Martin Ruef, Peter J. Mendel, and Carol A. Caronna. 2000. Institutional Change in Healthcare Organizations: From Professional Dominance to Managed Care. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2000 Winners

Marie-Kaure Djelic. 2001. Exporting the American Model: The Postwar Transformation of European Business. New York: Oxford University Press.

Howard Aldrich. 1999. Organizations Evolving. Thousand Oaks: SAGE.

5 thoughts on “Weber Award

  1. Pingback: 2011 OOW Section Awards « Organizations, Occupations and Work

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  5. Pingback: one more day till oow award deadlines | orgtheory.net

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