Call for Abstracts: The Sociology of International Organizations

Planned Preconference to the ASA Annual Meeting:
“Feeling Race—An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions”
August 10, 2018

Pre-conference Theme

At a time when globalization is increasingly contested in practice and scholarship, the rise of anti-globalization forces has cast the spotlight on the successes, failures and limitations of international organizations (IOs), ubiquitous actors which structure the institutional environment underpinning world economic, environmental and social affairs.

Political science has dominated the study of IOs. Yet, in recent years, a distinctive sociology of international organizations is emerging. It crosses over such diverse subfields as global and transnational sociology, economic sociology, sociologies of law and culture, organizations and professions. It variously focuses on markets and rights, health and finance, terrorism and development, among many other issues. Its theoretical and methodological variants reflect wider orientations in our discipline. Despite the promise of this diversity, however, strands of work on IOs in sociology have not adequately been brought into productive conversation with each other.

This year’s Annual Meeting theme “Feeling Race—An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions” offers opportunities to expand the sociology of international organizations in new directions. Neither in political science nor sociology has adequate attention been given to the structures of domination and race that permeate the transnational and global. Further, while emotion is salient in the decision-making and implementation of global governance, it has been little explored. Yet, it might offer a powerful sociological counterpoint to the rational actor, rational design and international political economy theories so prominent in political science and international relations.

Continue reading “Call for Abstracts: The Sociology of International Organizations”

Call for Papers: Understanding the Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangements

RSF:The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences
Issue on New Developments in American Job Quality: Understanding the Recent Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangments

Edited by:
David R. Howell, The New School
Arne L. Kalleberg, University of North Carolina

The question of job quality has emerged as a key challenge for researchers and policy-makers in the 21st century. The growing realization that the quality, not just the quantity, of jobs is central to addressing a myriad of social and economic problems—such as economic development, family formation and social integration, poverty and inequality, and individual well-being—has put this age-old topic on the front burner for social scientists.

This issue of RSF will focus on two important dimensions of the quality of jobs created in the past three decades in the United States. First, there has been an expansion of low-wage jobs, a phenomenon that has been documented by numerous studies, many of which have been sponsored by the Russell Sage Foundation. This proliferation of low-wage work, especially among younger workers, has contributed to the weakening of the middle class, reversing the dramatic improvements experienced by the middle of the income distribution in the three decades following World War II.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Understanding the Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangements”

Call for papers: Special Issue on Professionalism in a Globalising World

Call for papers: CAMBIO. RIVISTA SULLE TRASFORMAZIONI SOCIALI, December 2018
Special issue on Varieties of Professionalism in a Globalising World: New Theoretical Perspectives and Analytical Approaches
https://www.researchgate.net/project/Varieties-of-Professionalism-in-a-Globalising-World

The sociology of professions is at a crossroads. Dealing with multiple complexities, an update of its theoretical and conceptual tools seems necessary. The rise of the knowledge society has led to a new division of labour (see Machlup 1962; Drucker 1968; and Bell 1973). From this perspective, the increasing number of professionals in all developed countries can be explained by both the emergence of new professions, as well as the expansion of more traditional ones. After all, these processes are associated with growing segmentation and stratification of professional labour markets (Brint 1994). Moreover, the economic crisis has induced an increase in the average level of workers’ qualification due to the growth of employment in advanced business services, while simultaneously it has led to a corresponding loss of low-skilled employment (Gallie 2013). Therefore, the dimension of expertise has gained new centrality, with the study of expert labour receiving renewed scholarly attention (see Muzio et al. 2008).

Continue reading “Call for papers: Special Issue on Professionalism in a Globalising World”

Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment

Critical Practice in an Age of Complexity

Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment. Conference
Place: University of Arizona, Tucson
Dates: 22 – 23 February 2018
Abstract Deadline: 05 Dec 2017
http://architecturemps.com/arizona/

Context:
Donald Trump promises investment in infrastructure, China continues to urbanize, global cities are surrounded by slums and housing is unaffordable while simultaneously a form of capital investment.

The issues of living in the United States cities, towns and communities are more than just questions of the buildings we construct; the houses we make or the roads we build. The built environment reflects and informs social development, community conflict and economic opportunity, demographic disparity and more. To understand this complex relationship we need to think across discipline boundaries.

Disciplines:
Sociology, human geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning and more.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment”

Call for Papers: Exit, Voice and Loyalt

Call for papers: Exit, Voice and Loyalty: Alternative Economic Models and Responses to Decline in Contemporary Society
Poland, Warsaw, 21-22 May 2018

Guest speakers
Barbara Czarniawska (University of Gothenburg)
José Ossandón (Copenhagen Business School)

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 10 December 2017
http://economy-and-society.uw.edu.pl/nes2018_cfp/

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Exit, Voice and Loyalt”

Call for Papers: EGOS Sub-theme on the Impact of Organizational Practices on Career Outcomes

Call for Papers

At the core of research in organization studies lays the premise that organizations play a key role in generating and sustaining inequality in the workplace. For example, many studies show that women and racial minorities occupy lower quality jobs, through processes of screening, hiring, promotion, and termination. Recent empirical work has found that gender and racial disparities in the workplace remain even after the adoption of diversity programs, problem-solving team and job-training arrangements, merit-based pay practices, and other work policies. Other studies have also examined how structural factors internal to organizations, such as organizational size and tenure, hierarchical structure, and the use of job categories, affect ascriptive inequality. Ultimately, the distribution of resources, power and opportunities in society cannot be fully understood without paying attention to the impact of organizations and their practices on individual work outcomes.

The purpose of this sub-theme is to bring together a group of researchers who share a concern for advancing our knowledge about the impact of organizational practices on workplace inequality and diversity. In particular, our goal is to discuss innovative research that sheds new light on surprising theoretical mechanisms that explain how organizational practices affect key employment outcomes – such as assignment to jobs, wages, promotions, career advancement, training opportunities, etc. Because the nature of organizations and their boundaries are changing so rapidly, talking about “organizational practices” may not be the ideal way of thinking about these issues any more. Thus we also would like to explore the blurring of organizational boundaries, values, and procedures, the recent patterns of employee mobility, the increasing use of “market-driven” employment practices and the use of technology in the employment domain. We aim to examine how these developments shape new forms of economic and social inequality. This topic is not only relevant for the advancement of organizational theory and research, but it also has practical implications for employees, managers, communities, and society as a whole.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: EGOS Sub-theme on the Impact of Organizational Practices on Career Outcomes”

Call for Papers: “Precarious Work” Stream at 2018 ILPC

Precarious Work in Comparative Perspective
Call for Papers for Stream at the 2018 International Labour Process Conference (ILPC)

Stream Organizers:
Arne L. Kalleberg (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and
Steven P. Vallas (Northeastern University)

This stream focuses on theory, research and policy regarding precarious work in both advanced capitalist and developing countries. By precarious work, we mean work that is uncertain, insecure and in which risks are shifted from employers and governments to workers. For the majority of workers affected in advanced capitalist countries the expansion of precarious work represents a dramatic shift in the very logic that governs work under contemporary capitalism. For workers in developing countries, the growth of precarious work has created additional insecurity and uncertainty in the formal sector of their economies. Though these developments have been much studied, much remains unknown.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: “Precarious Work” Stream at 2018 ILPC”