Call for Papers: Seminar “Rethinking the free time/work time divide”

Seminar “Rethinking the free time/work time divide”

The seminar is organized by CIMMA-IMAGER (UR 3958), a research group affiliated with Université Paris-Est Créteil, France.
The (online and/or on-site) bimonthly sessions will take place from October to December 2021.
Proposals (300-word abstract + short biography) should be submitted by May 3, 2021.
Participants will be notified in June 2021.

In a seminal article entitled “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism” (1967), the historian E. P. Thompson analyzed the evolution of the concept of time in British society in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He demonstrated the importance of incorporating the question of time into the study of the transformations that took place in the organization of labor during industrialization. Subsequently, scholars have questioned the ways in which temporal norms in work contexts have changed over the past two centuries. For example, historians of labor have highlighted the role of trade unions in organizing the length of work hours since the end of the nineteenth century, while sociologists of labor have been particularly interested in definitions of “work” and the issue of measuring and managing the time that our contemporary societies devote to work.

Like others, E. P. Thompson also noted that the concept of time and its evolutions are issues that do not only concern work. The time devoted to hobbies, sports, holidays, entertainment, or tourism has become inherent to the study of free time. For example, social history has documented its institutionalization, as well as the practice of leisure and vacation in British or North American societies from the nineteenth century to the present day. Following in the tracks of Robert Stebbins, who coined the concept of “serious leisure,” some sociologists have renewed the theory of leisure practices.

Building on studies of volunteer work or “gray areas” of employment on the one hand, and of workers’ leisure practices on the other, this conference proposes to combine work time and free time in the English-speaking world in order to explore their various definitions, redefinitions and the ways in which they have interacted over the centuries. This means considering the ways in which these two temporalities have changed and hybridized each other, generating tensions or new forms of balance or complementarity. How has legislation in different countries regulated free time and labor time? To what extent have new practices of work and leisure blurred the boundaries between these two temporalities? How have different perceptions of the private and professional spheres changed the way people think about and experience work and leisure time?

For this seminar, we invite researchers in the various disciplines of the humanities and economic and social sciences to consider the following topics and approaches:

  • Mapping the intersections of research on free time and work time.
  • Philosophical approaches to work and leisure.
  • Images and representations.
  • Forms of work (craftwork, servile work, volunteer work, charity work, activism, “gray areas” of employment…).
  • Social conflicts, mobilization, and labor rights.
  • Gender and the organization of work.
  • Recreational practices in the workplace.
  • Boundaries, liminality, and intersections.
  • Methodological and archival particularities.

Submission of proposals and contact: sonia.birocheau@u-pec.fr and fabienne.moine@u-pec.fr

References:

Cindy S. Aron, Working at Play: A History of Vacations in the United States, New York, Oxford University Press, 1999.

Peter Bailey, Leisure and Class in Victorian England: Rational Recreation and the Contest for Control, 1830- 1885, London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978.

Peter Bailey, “Leisure, Culture, and the Historian: Reviewing the First Generation of Leisure Historiography in Britain”, Leisure Studies 8:2, 1989, 107-127.

Jean-Yves Boulin, Tiphaine de Rocquigny and Jean Viard. L’économie du temps libre (4/4). Le travail à l’assaut des loisirs. Entendez-vous l’éco? France culture, December 20, 2018. 58’.

Marie-Christine Bureau and Patrick Dieuaide, “Institutional Change and Transformations in Labour and Employment Standards: An Analysis of ‘Grey Zones’”, Transfer: European Review of Labor and Research, 24:3, August 2018, 261-277.

Hugh Cunningham, Time, Work and Leisure: Life Changes in England since 1700, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2014.

John Krinsky and Maud Simonet, “La servitude et le volontaire: les usages politiques du travail invisible dans les parcs de la ville de New York”, Sociétés contemporaines 2012/3 (n°87), 49-74.

Catriona M. Paratt, “Little Means or Time: Working-Class Women and Leisure in Late Victorian and Edwardian England”, The International Journal of the History of Sport 15:2, August 1998, 22-53.

Robert A. Stebbins, “Serious Leisure: A Conceptual Statement”, The Pacific Sociological Review 25:2, April 1982, 251-272.

Tim Strangleman, “Representations of Labour: Visual Sociology and Work”, Sociology Compass 2:5, 2008, 1491-1505.

E. P. Thompson, “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism”, Past and Present 38, December 1967, 56-97.

Call for Papers: Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences on:

Administrative Burdens as a Mechanism of Inequality in Policy Implementation

Edited by
Pamela Herd, Georgetown University
Hilary Hoynes, University of California Berkeley
Jamila Michener, Cornell University
Donald Moynihan, Georgetown University

This special issue invites empirical papers that seek to enlarge our understanding of how administrative burdens contribute to inequality in policy implementation processes and outcomes, and potential solutions to these problems. Administrative burdens are people’s experiences of policy implementation as onerous. Burdens include learning costs, i.e., the time and effort it takes to find information about public services and what is required to access them; compliance costs, which include the paperwork needed to demonstrate eligibility, and the time and financial costs required by administrative processes. Administrative burdens also take the form of psychological costs. Psychological costs include the experience of stigma from applying for and participating in an unpopular program. They might also arise via a sense of a loss of autonomy when people feel they are subject to intrusive or coercive state power, the stresses from not knowing whether one can negotiate administrative ordeals where critical resources hang in the balance, or the accumulation of frustrations that come with burdens, especially those seen as unjust or unnecessary.

Social scientists have grappled with this issue from specific disciplinary perspectives. Economics has focused on ‘take-up’ or how these barriers impede access, for eligible populations, to social welfare policies. Political science has explored how politics can shape the creation of burdens and how the experience of burdens can influence beliefs such as political efficacy and trust in government. Sociology has emphasized how these burdens, within the context of organizations, are both a function of and a contributor to gender, race, and class inequality. Public administration has clarified the organizational basis of administrative burdens, including the use of bureaucratic discretion. The goal of this issue is to bring insights from multiple disciplines to grapple with the broader implications of these burdens for inequality.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Anticipated Timeline

Prospective contributors should submit a CV and an abstract (up to two pages in length, single or double spaced) of their study along with up to two pages of supporting material (e.g., tables, figures, pictures, references that don’t fit on the proposal pages, etc.) no later than 5 PM EST on April 21, 2021 to:

https://rsf.fluxx.io

NOTE that if you wish to submit an abstract and do not yet have an account with us, it can take up to 48 hours to get credentials, so please start your application at least two days before the deadline. All submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in part or in full. Only abstracts submitted to https://rsf.fluxx.io

will be considered. Each paper will receive a $1,000 honorarium when the issue is published. All questions regarding this issue should be directed to Suzanne Nichols, Director of Publications, at journal@rsage.org and not to the email addresses of the editors of the issue.

A conference will take place at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on February 25, 2022. The selected contributors will gather for a one-day workshop to present draft papers (due a month prior to the conference on 1/25/22) and receive feedback from the other contributors and editors. Travel costs, food, and lodging for one author per paper will be covered by the foundation. Papers will be circulated before the conference. After the conference, the authors will submit their revised drafts by 6/1/22. The papers will then be sent out to three additional scholars for formal peer review. Having received feedback from reviewers and the RSF board, authors will revise their papers by 11/1/22. The full and final issue will be published in the fall of 2023. Papers will be published open access on the RSF website as well as in several digital repositories, including JSTOR and UPCC/Muse.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Call for Submissions: SPPS ASA Sessions

SPPS ASA SESSIONS

The SPPS section is planning some excellent sessions for the 2021 Virtual Meetings. We encourage submissions in the new, extended abstract format:

Sharing and Visualizing Sociological Results (Open)

We invite submissions from all sociologists that demonstrate high impact visualization of important results from scholarly research, sociological practice and in public sociology. Visualization of sociological results both quantitative and qualitative is becoming more and more important in many settings. To submit please send examples of the visualizations suitable for presentation, as well a brief discussion about the role of the visualization in communicating the results of your work.

Using Sociology in Practice, Applied and Public Settings

Many sociologists work outside of academic settings both in part or in whole. We seek to highlight examples of such work, which can include writing reports, consulting, testifying in court, appearing in local and national media, writing op-eds, engaging in policy debates, etc. Please provide a brief abstract highlighting such efforts, including op-eds, abstracts or executive summaries of reports, policy briefs, accounts of testimony, and the like. Such submissions may be brief but should be long enough to make it possible to envision what a presentation at the meeting would entail.

SPPS Contributed Roundtables

We welcome any topics regarding Sociological Practice, including applied sociology and any topics in Public Sociology.   Please submit an abstract and include in that abstract what written format you may like. These could include the following: report or paper abstract, op-ed, report to community or other group, report to non-profit, government agency or company, etc.  

Please submit to these sessions! As in 2019, we will plan time for networking. Last year our sessions were interactive and led to interesting conversations.

Sociology in Practice Settings Symposium

The Sociology in Practice Settings Symposium will be a  day-long symposium during the virtual Annual Meeting from August 7-10, 2021. Sociologists employed in non-profit organizations, commercial industry, government, research centers, and other non-academic settings are invited to submit proposals for 10-minute lightning presentations, 15-minute roundtable discussion topics, a 20-minute panel on special topic, “Putting Emancipatory Sociology to Work,” and 45-minute workshops that address the context-specific opportunities and challenges of their work. Click here to read more about the event and to submit your abstract before February 3rd. (https://www.asanet.org/annual-meeting-2021/sociology-practice-settings-symposium)

Feel free to reach out to Sidra Montgomery (sidra.montgomery@gmail.com), Chair of the symposium planning committee, or Nicole Amaya (nvamaya@asanet.org) with any questions. We also encourage you to share this information with your colleagues!

Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Professions and Organization

Special Issue of the Journal of Professions and Organization: Diversity and Inclusion in Changing Professional Organizations

Editors:
Swethaa Ballakrishnen, University of California, Irvine
David Brock, Ben-Gurion University
Elizabeth Gorman, University of Virginia

Contemporary scholars have shed considerable light on processes of gender, racial-ethnic, and social class inequality in traditional professional organizations. Yet much has happened over the past two or three decades to reshape contexts for professional services, as well as the kinds of individuals who populate them. Alongside older organizational forms, there have been shifts to institutionalize new kinds of work resulting in larger and more bureaucratic organizational logics across professional fields. Many have established different kinds of transnational presences with continuing implications for the interrelated relationships between the local and the global across sites. Liberalized regulatory structures in many countries permit new organizational structures and forms of ownership. Artificial intelligence and information technology have replaced and transformed the work that professionals once have done and/or need to do much longer. New occupations that lack longstanding professional traditions, such as data scientists and project managers, are now providing “professional” knowledge-based services. These structural changes have, in turn, had important effects on individual capacities, outcomes, and experiences. At the broadest levels, inequality in income, status, and autonomy within professions has grown. At the same time, there have been new kinds of inequities buttressed as progress, and new rewards to interactional capital. The demographics of the kinds of individuals who seek (and are sought within) these professional milieus are changing, strategic corporate investments as they relate to global social movements have begun to offer new kinds of opportunities, and these changes have resulted in corresponding changes within professional experiences and environments.

What do these myriad changes and movements across different levels of analysis mean for gender, racial ethnic, class, and other forms of difference and inequality in professional organizations? At the individual level, do the same mechanisms of bias and exclusion previously identified in traditional professional service firms—such as stereotyping and preference for social similarity—continue to affect career outcomes as before? Do these changes have different implications for different demographic groups, or in different geographic sites? What career strategies do individual professionals utilize as they seek to navigate these changing waters? At the organizational level, what practices and structures promote or hinder diversity and inclusion? How have professional organizations sought to manage their increasing diversity? Which deliberate interventions are most effective, and which conflict with other organizational practices and goals? How, if at all, have clients influenced professional organizations’ efforts with respect to diversity and inclusion?

To address these and related questions, we invite scholarly papers from a wide range of disciplines and academic perspectives. We welcome submissions that address different levels of analysis (individual, firm, interactional, field) and make use of a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods. We especially encourage authors who investigate new forms of inequality, new managerial and organizational approaches to diversity and inclusion, and research on sites that are transnational, comparative, and/or global. If you have questions about whether you project might be a fit, please reach out to one or more of the guest editors (sballakrishnen@law.uci.edu, dmb@bgu.ac.il, eg5n@virginia.edu).

Deadline for full papers: June 15, 2021 Submit via: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpo

For more information about Journal of Professions and Organization see academic.oup.com/jpo/pages/why-submit

Call for Papers: ISA Conference: Work of the Future Redux: Technology, Innovation Policy

The deadline to submit to the ISA conference (June 2-4), Work of the Future Redux: Technology, Innovation Policy is coming up on Friday, January 22nd.  

Please submit your paper or panel proposal here. See a list of conference tracks here. 

You can also renew your annual membership here. Memberships are critical to the financial health of the ISA and are greatly appreciated! 

Now, more than ever, communities like the ISA are important for fostering connection, collaboration, knowledge sharing and professional networks. Please submit a proposal and join us in June! 

All the best, 

Liz Reynolds
ISA Program Chair, 2021

Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Proposals for paper and panel submissions are due Friday, January 22nd. See link for details. Those who submitted papers or panels for last year’s conference are encouraged to submit their updated proposals this year. 

ISA 2021 Call for Papers

Submit Your Paper Proposal Here

Submit Your Panel Proposal Here

Registration opens in early 2021

Visit our website:industrystudies.org

Call for Papers: Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences on:

SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Edited by
Steven Raphael, University of California, Berkeley
Daniel Schneider, Harvard Kennedy School

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare and exacerbated many of the structural inequalities in the United States. Within a few months of the first documented community transmission, nearly one quarter of the workforce filed for unemployment benefits, with low-income workers and those with less flexibility in scheduling and the ability to work remotely disproportionately experiencing job loss. Meanwhile, workers deemed essential, from health care providers, to supermarket employees, to delivery workers, bore the brunt of exposure to infection while others sheltered in place under state and local orders. These unequal labor market experiences may have exacerbated existing inequalities in material hardship, household economic insecurity, and poverty, but the impacts of the pandemic may have also exposed previously economically secure groups to insecurity. Together, the labor market shocks of COVID-19 combined with the disruption to childcare and K-12 schooling have likely also altered the amount and division of household labor with respect to housework and care-work. Such dynamics may have affected gender inequalities in labor market persistence and re-entry.

We know that the pandemic has disproportionately impacted institutionalized and marginalized populations who are resource poor and, in some instances, politically disenfranchised. African Americans and Latinos are disproportionately represented among documented Covid-19 cases and fatalities, due in part to pre-existing disparities in health problems, differential access to health care, and differential exposure to essential work. Many of the largest outbreaks have occurred in institutionalized settings, such as nursing homes, rehabilitation facilities, state and federal prisons, and local jails. The pandemic has hit Native American communities particularly hard, as they tend to be located in rural areas with poor access to sufficient health services.

For this issue of RSF, we invite original research contributions pertaining to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on socioeconomic inequality in the United States and in particular how pre-existing inequalities may have mediated the impact of the pandemic and in turn been exacerbated by the current crisis. We are particularly interested in studies that focus on how institutions, ranging from the health care system, corrections and criminal justice, childcare policies, social safety net programs, and labor market policies have either mitigated or exacerbated the impact of the pandemic on social and economic outcomes as well as studies that focus on the likely longer-term impacts of the pandemic on inequality in the United States.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Anticipated Timeline

Prospective contributors should submit a CV and an abstract (up to two pages in length, single or double spaced) of their study along with up to two pages of supporting material (e.g., tables, figures, pictures, references that don’t fit on the proposal pages, etc.) no later than 5 PM EST on March 10, 2021 to:

https://rsf.fluxx.io

NOTE that if you wish to submit an abstract and do not yet have an account with us, it can take up to 48 hours to get credentials, so please start your application at least two days before the deadline. All submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in part or in full. Only abstracts submitted to https://rsf.fluxx.io will be considered. Each paper will receive a $1,000 honorarium when the issue is published. All questions regarding this issue should be directed to Suzanne Nichols, Director of Publications, at journal@rsage.org and not to the email addresses of the editors of the issue.

A conference will take place at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on December 10, 2021. The selected contributors will gather for a one-day workshop to present draft papers (due a month prior to the conference on November 12, 2021 ) and receive feedback from the other contributors and editors. Travel costs, food, and lodging for one author per paper will be covered by the foundation. Papers will be circulated before the conference. After the conference, the authors will submit their revised drafts by March 6, 2022. The papers will then be sent out to three additional scholars for formal peer review. Having received feedback from reviewers and the RSF board, authors will revise their papers by September 13, 2022. The full and final issue will be published in the fall of 2023. Papers will be published open access on the RSF website as well as in several digital repositories, including JSTOR and UPCC/Muse.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Call for Papers: 2021 Junior Theorists Symposium

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
2021 Junior Theorists Symposium
Held over Zoom on August 6th (additional dates TBD)

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Friday, February 19, 2021

We invite submissions of précis for the 15th Junior Theorists Symposium (JTS). The symposium will be held over Zoom on August 6th (additional dates TBD) prior to the 2021 ASA Virtual Annual Meeting.  The JTS is a conference featuring the work of up-and-coming sociologists, sponsored in part by the Theory Section of the ASA. Since 2005, the conference has brought together early career sociologists who engage in theoretical work, broadly defined. 

It is our honor to announce that Jean Beaman (University of California, Santa Barbara), Gil Eyal (Columbia University), and Frederick Wherry (Princeton University) will serve as discussants for this year’s symposium. Kyle Green (SUNY Brockport) and Daniel Winchester (Purdue), winners of the 2019 Junior Theorist Award, and Neil Gong (University of Michigan and University of California, San Diego), winner of the 2020 Junior Theorist Award will deliver keynote addresses. Finally, the symposium will include an after-panel titled “Theorizing for Troubled Times,” with panelists Javier Auyero (University of Texas, Austin), Jennifer Carlson (University of Arizona), Harvey Molotch (New York University), Christina Simko (Williams), and Howard Winant (University of California, Santa Barbara).

We invite all ABD graduate students, recent PhDs, postdocs, and assistant professors who received their PhDs from 2017 onwards to submit up to a three-page précis (800-1000 words). The précis should include the key theoretical contribution of the paper and a general outline of the argument. Successful précis from last year’s symposium can be viewed here. Please note that the précis must be for a paper that is not under review or forthcoming at a journal.

As in previous years, there is no pre-specified theme for the conference. Papers will be grouped into sessions based on emergent themes and discussants’ areas of interest and expertise. We invite submissions from all substantive areas of sociology, we especially encourage papers that are works-in-progress and would benefit from the discussions at JTS.

Please remove all identifying information from your précis and submit it via this Google form. Sarah Brothers (Yale) and Laura Halcomb (University of California, Santa Barbara) will review the anonymized submissions. You can also contact them at juniortheorists@gmail.com with any questions. The deadline is Friday, February 19th. By mid-March, we will extend up to 12 invitations to present at JTS 2021. Please plan to share a full paper by July 6, 2021. Presenters will be asked to attend the symposium in its entirety in order to hear fellow scholars’ work. Please plan accordingly.

Call for Papers: Sex Work: Erotic Labor in the 21st Century

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A NEW VOLUME ON THE SEX INDUSTRY
SEX WORK: Erotic Labor in the 21st Century 
Under consideration with NYU Press 

Editors: Bernadette Barton, Barb Brents, and Angela Jones 

In the 21st century, sex work encompasses a wide array of temporary, professional, informal, formal, and entrepreneurial forms of work.  Despite popular media reducing sex work to “prostitution,” commercial sex markets vary widely and include camming, full-service sex workin a range of contexts, (e.g., street-based, brothel work, and escorts), hostessing, phone sex, pornography, pro-dommes, stripping, sugar relationship, and other forms of individual sexual entrepreneurship.  Due to rapidly changing technologies, growing inequalities, and precarious employment, people’s experiences of the sex trades have changed. All this speaks to the need for a holistic, context-based volume to understand today’s varied commercial sex-based services.   

Sex Work is split into two sections—Basics and New Directions—and features the voices of sex workers, sex worker advocates, researchers, experts, and activists.  The Basics section will introduce readers to the key dimensions of the sex industry.  We invite you to submit your writing on the sex industry for consideration for the New Directions section of this volume. Your contribution should be short, readable, and appropriate for a student and lay audience. Submissions can cover any major sector of sex work, including new and emerging forms of individual entrepreneurship such as content production and findoming on social media and other sites. While not a sex work sector, we also welcome submissions on sex trafficking.   

We accept first-person accounts and research that explore a wide range of themes, including but not limited to: immigration/migration, the gig economy, new forms of digital sex work, BDSM, changes related to online pornography, sex trafficking, raunch culture, the rescue industry, faith based interventions in sex work and the national and transnational impact of SESTA/FOSTA and other legislation as well as writing about market organization and commercial sex economies. 

Sex workers often discuss the importance of examining what they colloquially call the “whorearachy,” a stratification system within the sex industry that privileges certain forms of sex work over others.  We seek essays that examine how worker subjectivity and social position in the whorearchy affect consent, risks, access to resources, autonomy, and pleasure.  Finally, we are especially interested in work centering underrepresented groups such as Black, Indigenous, and other people of color; transfeminine, transmasculine, and non-binary people; LGBTQIA+ sex workers; people with disabilities; and workers outside of the US. 

Please submit a 250-500 word abstract and 150-word author biography by 1/15/21 to b.bartonmoreheadstate.edu, barb.brents@unlv.edu, and jonesa@farmingdale.edu. The editors will review abstracts and invite full manuscripts for consideration by 6/15/21.  Full manuscripts should not exceed 5000 words.  An invitation to submit a full manuscript does not guarantee acceptance.  If you have questions, please email any of the editors.   

Call for Papers: Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences on:

The Social and Political Impact of COVID-19 in the United States

Editors: Beth Redbird (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University), Laurel Harbridge-Yong (Associate Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University), Rachel Davis Mersey (Associate Dean for Research and Jesse H. Jones Centennial Professor, University of Texas at Austin). 

Note: This will be the first of three COVID-19 related calls. The second call, in spring 2021, will focus on socio-economic impacts and will be edited by Steven Raphael (University of California, Berkeley) and Daniel Schneider (John F. Kennedy School). The third call, in fall 2021, will focus on educational impacts and will be edited by Dominique Baker (Southern Methodist University), Michal Kurlaender (University of California, Davis), Susanna Loeb (Brown University), and Ruth N. López Turley (Rice University).

The COVID-19 pandemic is quickly leading to broad changes in society and upending ways of life across the globe. It is important to begin to understand the social and political factors that shape the response to the pandemic, as well as how the pandemic alters subsequent political and social dynamics for individuals, groups, communities, and institutions. While the COVID-19 pandemic is a clear public health challenge, it also has social, political, and economic problems of interest to social scientists. We recognize that we are at the beginning of a full and deep understanding of the relationships between COVID-19 and U.S. society, but it is evident that immediate issues are emerging. For example, public adoption of advised health behaviors relies on a successful interplay of public policy, personal and mass communication, and public attitudes toward government and fellow citizens. For a pandemic response to be effective, policy makers must devise strategies, information must be conveyed to the public, and individual attitudes and behaviors must change. The rise of diseases such as SARS, MERS, H1N1, and COVID-19 underlines the need to understand these phenomena—not just epidemiologically, but as socially and politically important events. Social and political factors impact government and individual responses to the pandemic, and the pandemic also alters the political and social fabric of the country. That means issues of power, status, resources, culture, politics, and social structures play center stage as the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, unfolded and continues.

The magnitude of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the governmental responses that follow, have sweeping political and social consequences, which we are just beginning to study. Additionally, citizens’ experiences with the pandemic may shape subsequent behaviors, such as strategies for collecting and processing of information, trust in government, voting behavior, and civic engagement. Likewise, the pandemic and related governmental responses have important consequences on existing social and political inequalities, including race, class, and region of residence.

In this issue, we invite theoretical and empirical papers which enhance our initial understanding of the social and political impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak. Our aim is to highlight outstanding early research on: (1) how social and political dynamics shape responses to the pandemic; and (2) how the pandemic itself alters social and political dynamics for individuals, communities and institutions. This includes research exemplifying the interplay among politics and policy; information exchange; economics; psychology; social structures, including networks and institutions; power and status; and public behavior in the United States. We welcome research from across the social sciences, including communications, economics, education, organizational behavior, political science, psychology, and sociology. Papers may employ a variety of methods and data, including both quantitative and qualitative. We are particularly interested in studies that deepen our understanding of social institutions in times of crisis and change. In the United States, the decentralized nature of the pandemic response created cleavages between regions, urban and rural areas, demographic populations, and other groups leading to significant power and status differentials. Papers that analyze geographic, racial, socioeconomic, political, or other status and power inequalities are welcome, as are papers that leverage key events, geographic variation, or temporal differences. Papers with an international focus will be considered only if they have clear comparison with, or direct implications for, the United States.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Anticipated Timeline

Prospective contributors should submit a CV and an abstract (up to two pages in length, single or double spaced) of their study along with up to two pages of supporting material (e.g., tables, figures, pictures, etc.) no later than 5 PM EST on November 3, 2020, to:

rsf.fluxx.io

(NOTE that if you wish to submit an abstract and do not yet have an account with us, it can take up to 48 hours to get credentials, so please start your application at least two days before the deadline.)

All submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in part or in full. Only abstracts submitted to rsf.fluxx.io will be considered. Each paper will receive a $1,000 honorarium when the issue is published. All questions regarding this issue should be directed to Suzanne Nichols, Director of Publications, at journal@rsage.org and not to the email addresses of the editors of the issue.

A conference will take place at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on June 11, 2021 (with a dinner the night before). The selected contributors will gather for a one-day workshop to present draft papers (due a month prior to the conference on 5/11/21 ) and receive feedback from the other contributors and editors. Travel costs, food, and lodging for one author per paper will be covered by the foundation. Papers will be circulated before the conference. After the conference, the authors will submit their revised drafts by 9/30/21. The papers will then be sent out to three additional scholars for formal peer review. Having received feedback from reviewers and the RSF board, authors will revise their papers by 3/10/22. The full and final issue will be published in the fall of 2022. Papers will be published open access on the RSF website as well as in several digital repositories, including JSTOR and UPCC/Muse.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Call for Paper: Gender, Work & Organization: Crises and the (Re)Organizing of Gender and Work

Call for Papers: Crises and the (Re)Organizing of Gender and Work

Journal: Gender, Work & Organization

With this special issue, we seek to understand and explore how feminist organizations and activists around the world mobilize in the face of crisis events to resist the structural marginalization of gender and work issues.

We invite interested authors to send an extended abstract (750-1000 words) and a short bio for each author (150 words) before 28 September 2020. The abstract must clearly state the title, question(s) for discussion within the framework of the special issue, theoretical or/and empirical ground. Extended abstracts should be sent to corresponding co-editors Jamie Callahan (jamie.callahan@northumbria.ac.uk) and Kristy Kelly (kek72@drexel.edu).

More information is available here.

Invitations for full submission will be sent mid-October.

Deadline for full submissions: 1 March 2021