Call for Papers: Contexts: Ethnographies of the Global South

Contexts is a quarterly magazine that makes cutting-edge social research accessible to general readers. The magazine is issuing a call for papers for its Winter 2021 issue, dedicated to “Ethnographies of the Global South.” This special issue will be guest edited by Victoria Reyes, assistant professor of sociology at the University of California-Riverside, and Marco Garrido, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. 

In recent years, there has been a blossoming of ethnographies on the Global South within sociology; this represents something new. Historically, American ethnographers within the discipline have plied their trade almost exclusively within the U.S. context. Casting our eye south has produced a vivid description of “foreign” social worlds.

These descriptions have proven to be a goldmine theoretically. They challenge and compel us to revise many of the analytical categories we largely take for granted, from race and segregation, to state and civil society. In making “foreign” contexts familiar, the new ethnographies of the Global South are expanding our sociological imagination in exciting ways.

We are looking for papers that embody a deeper engagement with Southern contexts. We are seeking robust descriptions of everyday life rooted in these contexts. The papers should demonstrate how detailed descriptions serve to extend not only just the empirical but also the conceptual boundaries of sociology.

We are asking that potential authors submit a two-page proposal by March 1, 2020. The editorial team will notify all authors of our decision by April 2, 2020. Authors whose proposals are accepted will need to return a full submission of approximately 3,000 words by June 1, 2020 for peer review. Articles that pass peer review will be further revised by the editorial team with final text due by September 1, 2020. Authors interested in submitting a piece are highly encouraged to read our submission guidelines.

Call for Applications: Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences

Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences: Linking Theory and Empirical Research
Berlin, July 20 – 30, 2020

We are delighted to announce the 10th edition of the Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences. The summer school aims at supporting young researchers by strengthening their ability in linking theory and empirical research. The two-week program creates an excellent basis for the development of their current research designs.

In the first week, we address the key methodological challenges of concept-building, causation/explanation, and micro-macro linkage that occur in almost all research efforts. We strive for a clarification of the epistemological foundations underlying methodological paradigms. In the second week, these methodological considerations are applied to central empirical fields of research in political science, sociology, and other related disciplines.

In this second part of the program, participants are assigned to four thematic groups according to their own research topic. The thematic areas covered are: “Global Governance & International Relations”, “Citizenship, Migration, and Identities”, “Social Struggle and Globalization”, and “Democracy at the Crossroads”.

The program is characterized by a varied format comprised of lectures, workshops, seminars, and a one-to-one consultation. During the summer school, participants will also have the opportunity to present and discuss their own work extensively. Participants will be provided with hands-on advice for their research designs.

The school brings together a faculty of renowned international and Berlin-based scholars. Among the confirmed international lecturers are Ann Swidler (UC Berkeley), David Stark (Columbia University and University of Warwick), Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore), Felix Berenskoetter (SOAS University of London), Hendrik Wagenaar (Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna and King’s College London) and Vera Troeger (University of Warwick).

The Berlin Summer School was co-funded by the Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences (BGSS) at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. Details on the location and tuition fees can be found on our webpage: www.berlinsummerschool.de

The international summer school is open to up to 60 PhD candidates, advanced master students, and young postdocs. The call for applications is currently open. Applications can be submitted online via the application form on the summer school webpage until March 22, 2020.

The decisions of the selection committee will be announced to the applicants in April. If you have any further questions, please contact the organizing team at bgsssumm@hu-berlin.de

Call for Applications: The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

UPDATE: “At Warwick we have decided to offer a free place at our Summer School on Practice and Process Studies for scholars who are affiliated with an institution based outside of Europe, North America, Australasia or East Asia, or who are resident there. We are looking to support scholars who document practices in non-traditional settings.”

The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

Practice, Process and Issues of Scale in Global Challenges (13-16 July, 2020)

Following on from our highly successful Summer Schools in the last seven years, we are pleased to announce the 2020 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies.

The Workshop takes place from Monday 13 July to Thursday 16 July on the University of Warwick campus, Coventry, UK. The School is programmatically multi-disciplinary and open to a variety of approaches and sensitivities. It is organised by Warwick’s Practice, Process, and Institutions (PPI) Research Programme in collaboration with the International Symposium Series on Process Organization Studies (PROS).

The variable theme of this year’s summer school focuses on the issue of Scale in Global Challenges. An increasing number of scholars is interested in studying global challenges, such as climate change, poverty, health technologies, policy making, etc. Capturing such large-scale phenomena can be a challenge for practice and process scholar:  Should we take a micro or macro lens? Where should we look? How do we connect small scale and large-scale phenomena? How about local actions and global actions? In the summer school, we will advance these discussions in two ways: We will (1) rethink the methods we use to study phenomena of societal importance, and (2) shift from scale as a category of analysis to scale as a category of practice.

This year the school is programmatically aimed at advanced PhDs students and early career scholars who already have substantial experience with process and practice approaches in their research.

Full details for the event, which includes information about the application and registration fees, can be found on our website.

To apply, please submit your application by February 28th via this link

If you have any questions please email Katharina Dittrich.

Call for Papers: Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences on:

Status: What Is It, and Why Does It Matter for Inequality?

Editors: Cecilia L. Ridgeway (Stanford University) and Hazel Rose Markus (Stanford University)

Status can be defined simply as a comparative social ranking on the basis of esteem, honor, prestige, and respect which creates a form of inequality and hierarchy among those ranked. This simple definition, however, leaves unanswered complex questions about what status really is as a social process and why scholars of inequality should be concerned with it. For instance, what do we make of evidence that concerns about status are often as or more powerful motivators for life decisions than economic incentives? Why is it that threats to status foster conflicts and undermine performance, health and well-being? And why and how does status matter for broader patterns of inequality in society based on valued life outcomes such as wealth, power, and health? The proposed issue grows from the need for a deeper story about what the nature of status inequality is and how it works that will allow us to address such questions.

In this issue, we invite theoretical and empirical papers that seek to enlarge our understanding of the nature and significance of status as a form of inequality and that illuminate the roles status plays in driving, maintaining, or changing inequality in wealth, power, or well-being in contemporary advanced industrial societies. We welcome papers from across the social sciences, including sociology, psychology, organizational behavior, economics, political science, and communications. Papers may employ a variety of methods and data from quantitative to qualitative. We are interested in papers that address any aspect of our general call but that, in particular, deepen our understanding of what status really is as a social process. In the link below we offer a list of questions and issues, organized into broad themes, that such papers might address. This list is suggestive only and is not meant to limit the topics papers might cover.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Anticipated Timeline

Prospective contributors should submit a CV and an abstract (up to two pages in length, single or double spaced) of their study along with up to two pages of supporting material (e.g., tables, figures, pictures, etc.) no later than 5 PM EST on April 7, 2020, to:

https://rsf.fluxx.io

(NOTE that if you wish to submit an abstract and do not yet have an account with us, it can take up to 48 hours to get credentials, so please start your application at least two days before the deadline.)

All submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in part or in full. Only abstracts submitted to https://rsf.fluxx.io will be considered. Each paper will receive a $1,000 honorarium when the issue is published. All questions regarding this issue should be directed to Suzanne Nichols, Director of Publications, at journal@rsage.org and not to the email addresses of the editors of the issue.

A conference will take place at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on February 26, 2021 (with a group dinner the night before). The selected contributors will gather for a one-day workshop to present draft papers (due a month prior to the conference (on 1/26/21) and receive feedback from the other contributors and editors. Travel costs, food, and lodging for one author per paper will be covered by the foundation. Papers will be circulated before the conference. After the conference, the authors will submit their revised drafts by 5/19/21. The papers will then be sent out to three additional scholars for formal peer review. Having received feedback from reviewers and the RSF board, authors will revise their papers by 11/1/21. The full and final issue will be published in the spring of 2022. Papers will be published open access on the RSF website as well as in several digital repositories, including JSTOR and UPCC/Muse.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Member Publication: The differential impact of network connectedness and size on researchers’ productivity and influence

Please check out the following recent publication by OOW members Tsahi Hayat, Dimitrina Dimitrova, and Barry Wellman. 2020. “The Differential Impact of Network Connectedness and Size on Researchers’ Productivity and Influence.” Information, Communication and Society 23: 5.

Abstract:

We analyze the effect of different types of online and offline ties – acquaintanceship, advice, and co-authorship – on researchers’ productivity and influence. Unlike static studies of networked work, we look at how changes in these networks affected researchers’ performance and influence. Using the number of publications as an indicator of productivity and the number of citations as an indicator of influence, we investigate when researchers were more productive and influential. We study whether their networks were cohesive, if the researchers were central in their networks or linked to central players, and whether their work had more opportunities to be disseminated through diverse, non-redundant ties. Although the connectedness of their networks was positively associated with the researchers’ productivity, it was the non-redundant effective size of the networks that was positively associated with the researchers’ influence

Call for Papers: 20th Conference of the International Association for the Economics of Participation (IAFEP)

Please, see the following the call for papers for the 2020 IAFEP conference, (June 21‐24, 2020, La Jolla, California, United States).

The International Association for the Economics of Participation (IAFEP) gathers scholars dedicated to exploring the economics of democratic and participatory organizations, such as labor‐managed firms, cooperatives and firms with broad‐based employee share‐ownership, profit sharing and worker participation schemes, as well as democratic nonprofit, community and social enterprises. The IAFEP Conferences, which take place every two years, provide an international forum for presentations and discussions of current research on the economics of participation. The 2020 IAFEP Conference will be held in La Jolla (California, United States), alongside and in collaboration with the Beyster Symposium, sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Employee Ownership and Profit Sharing of Rutgers University.

Submissions for the 2020 conference are invited from all relevant fields of study, including comparative economic systems, industrial and labor economics, organizational studies, social economics, management studies, institutional economics, evolutionary economics, development economics, sociology, psychology, political science, law, and philosophy. Interdisciplinary approaches are welcomed. We also invite proposals for complete sessions.

Key themes:

1/ Development and dynamics of financial and decision‐making participation
The range of organizations implementing financial and decision‐making participation is broad and growing, from profit sharing to employee ownership, flat‐organizations, employees on the board, trade‐unions, etc. The drivers of the different types of participation can be very diverse. We are interested in research about the evolution and implications of participation in these organizations in industrialized, post‐industrial, transition, and developing economies.

2/ Effects of participation on firms’ and workers’ outcomes
We invite communications on the impact of workers’ participation on firms’ economic performance, as well as other outcomes – such as wages, working conditions, human resource practices, corporate social responsibility practices, etc. Communications with empirical approaches are particularly encouraged.

3/ Socio‐economic and political environment
The creation, growth and stability of participatory firms are influenced by the economic and social environment as well as the public policies and laws surrounding firms and participation. We welcome communications about the incidence of this broad environment on participation, including historical and international comparative approaches.

4/ Economic participation and political democracy
Participation in firms also raises the question of the relationship between economic participation and political democracy. On one hand, can economic participation affect political involvement of workers‐citizens? On the other hand, is economic participation more likely to thrive in a democratic and more egalitarian environment?

Extended Abstracts (max. 1000 words) in English should be sent by e‐mail to Trevor Young‐Hyman and Nathalie Magne at iafep2020@gmail.com by February 28, 2020. Abstracts should include full details of institutional affiliations and e‐mail addresses. Proposals for complete sessions should include a brief description of the theme of the session and an abstract for each paper.

Authors will be notified by March 31, 2020 whether their papers are accepted for presentation. Complete drafts should reach us by June 1, 2020 in order to be handed out to Conference participants.

Conference Dates
The conference will consist of three full day sessions on June 22, 23 and 24. A welcoming reception will take place on June 21.

Registration and Accommodations
Detailed information on registration (including fees) and local accommodations will be available on the conference website in early February.

Participants from Developing and Transition Economies and Students
A small amount of funding is available for participants from developing and transition economies and students. In order to be considered for the funding, researchers should clarify it in the abstract submission.

Horvat‐Vanek Prize
The Horvat‐Vanek prize is awarded every two years for a research paper of exceptional quality written by a young scholar in one of the areas of interest to IAFEP. The prize, of a value of US$ 1,000, will be awarded during the conference. In order to be considered for the prize, researchers and doctoral students aged 35 or under should submit one research paper in English (maximum length 10,000 words) by April 20, 2020 to iafep2020@gmail.com. Please, include your institutional affiliation and an abstract, and indicate clearly on the paper that you wish it to be considered for the Horvat‐Vanek prize (the recipient will be requested to provide a passport or other official evidence of their date of birth in order to receive the prize).

Member Publication: Gender Flexibility, but not Equality: Young Adults’ Division of Labor Preferences

Please check out the following recent publication by OOW members Brittany N. Dernberger and Joanna R. Pepin. 2020. “Gender Flexibility, but not Equality: Young Adults’ Division of Labor Preferences.” Sociological Science 7: 36-56.

Abstract:

Rising acceptance of mothers’ labor force participation is often considered evidence of increased support for gender equality. This approach overlooks perceptions of appropriate behavior for men and gender dynamics within families. We use nationally representative data of 12th-grade students from Monitoring the Future surveys (1976 to 2014) to evaluate changes in youths’ preferred division of labor arrangements. Over this period, contemporary young people exhibited greater openness to a variety of division of labor scenarios for their future selves as parents, although the husband-as-earner/wife-as-homemaker arrangement remained most desired. Using latent class analysis, we identify six configurations of gender attitudes: conventionalists, neotraditionalists, conventional realists, dual earners, intensive parents, and strong intensive parents. There are no gender egalitarian configurations—exhibiting equal support for both parents’ time at work and time at home. Our findings indicate researchers must distinguish between adoption of gender egalitarian principles and gender flexibility in dividing time at work and at home.