Call for Papers: Consequences of Change in Healthcare for Organizations, Workers, and Patients

CALL FOR PAPERS

Consequences of Change in Healthcare for Organizations, Workers, and Patients

A Mini-Conference and Avenue for Peer-Reviewed Publication

This call invites papers for a conference and subsequent special issue of Work & Occupations devoted to the consequences of change in healthcare for organizations, workers, and patients. Scholars interested in participating should submit a completed paper to the conference organizers and special issue co-editors Ariel C. Avgar (Cornell), Adrienne E. Eaton (Rutgers), Rebecca Givan (Rutgers), and Adam Seth Litwin (Cornell) by August 1st, 2018. Authors whose papers are accepted will be invited to a conference sponsored by the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University to be held in New Brunswick, New Jersey, on January 9-11, 2019.

Papers presented at this conference should be suitable for submission to external reviewers. Based on the organizers’ recommendations, discussions at the conference, and fit with the special issue, a subset of authors will be asked to submit their papers to Work & Occupations with the expectation that their papers will be published in the special issue once they pass the external review process. Papers that reviewers deem of good quality that are not selected for the special issue will be considered for publication in a regular issue of Work & Occupations.

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SocArXiv announces April 30 deadline for SOAR awards

Submitted a paper for an ASA section award? Post it to SocArXiv.org by April 30 to be eligible for a SOAR (Sociology Open Access Recognition) award as well. All shared papers that win an ASA section award will, upon notifying SocArXiv, receive a $250 SOAR award in recognition of the achievement. Submissions for graduate student award competitions are also eligible. Support open access and get the word out about your research by sharing your work on SocArXiv today. For more information about the SOAR program and how to your paper, visit socopen.org, or contact socarxiv@gmail.com.

Lecturer in International Management, Loughborough University London Campus

Dear Colleagues,

Lecturer in the UK is equivalent to an assistant professor in the US. Loughborough is a highly ranked research university in the UK. The London campus only teaches grad students (MS & PhD). The Institute of International Management is a critical institute consisting of sociologists and political economists, focusing on work, management, organizations and governance in comparative perspective. Feel free to contact me if you have questions.

Best
Matt Vidal

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Meet Your Council: Elizabeth Popp Berman

Popp-Berman1b(1)Elizabeth Popp Berman is currently serving on the OOW Council.  Berman is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Albany, SUNY.  Her current book project, Thinking Like an Economist: How Economics Became the Language of U.S. Public Policy (Princeton University Press), examines the role of economics in the development of science, antitrust and antipoverty policy in the U.S. from 1960 to 1985.  Her first book, Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine (Princeton University Press, 2012) earned the OOW’s Max Weber Book Award in 2013.  Below, Berman expands upon her research and teaching, as well as her thoughts on the state of the subfield.  Continue reading “Meet Your Council: Elizabeth Popp Berman”

New Member Publication: Doering on Personal Ties in Microfinance

OOW members may be interested in this new publication from Laura Doering at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto:

Doering, Laura. 2018. “Risk, Returns and Relational Lending: Personal Ties in Microfinance.” American Journal of Sociology 123(5):1341–81.

Personal relationships often facilitate credit transactions. However, existing research holds different expectations about whether personal ties prove detrimental or beneficial for lenders. Economic sociology highlights the advantages lenders accrue when they have personal ties with borrowers. Yet research from social psychology suggests that personal ties can be costly because lenders may “escalate commitment” to poor performers. This study uses data from a microfinance bank to ask: When are personal relationships detrimental or beneficial for lenders? It shows that lenders with personal ties to borrowers are less likely to cut those ties and their borrowers miss fewer payments. However, these trends vary with frequency of contact. When lenders and borrowers interact infrequently, lenders continue to show strong commitment, but borrowers become less compliant, creating potential problems for lenders. This study integrates theories from economic sociology and social psychology to offer a more nuanced, temporally informed understanding of personal ties in finance.

Call for Papers: Journal of Sociology special issue on inequalities in the gig economy

Special edition of the Journal of Sociology 2019 on inequalities in the gig economy era: gender and generation challenges edited by Brendan Churchill, Signe Ravn and Lyn Craig, University of Melbourne. The special edition will focus on the intersecting implications for gender and generational inequalities in the ‘gig economy’ era, a term which we use to describe the contemporary labour market characterised by precarious employment and new (digital) forms of job seeking and entrepreneurship that expose workers to greater financial risks, social insecurities and inequalities. It will also consider the gendered dimensions of educational participation outcomes in the light of these changed labour market conditions. Deadline for submission of a 300-word abstract for consideration: 8 April 2018. More details: http://arts.unimelb.edu.au/e/gig-economy

Job Posting: Postdoc at the Center for Employment Equity, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

The Center for Employment Equity, University of Massachusetts, Amherst is searching for a Post-Doc researcher.  The position has primary responsibility to manage the development of a user friendly data platform to give citizens – job seekers, economic developers, employers, journalists, activists, etc. – access to EEOC data on employment quality and discrimination complaints. Tasks will include developing a series of reports on employment equity and a linked web based data platform aimed at broad dissemination of employment equity data to various publics. The core data for this project are contemporary employer reports on private and public sector employers generated by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission as well as individual discrimination complaints to the EEOC. Initial work on developing the data portal and initial reports are nearing completion. Future work will focus primarily on both policy oriented and basic science research and research dissemination. You will work closely with the project PIs and one or more Ph.D. level research assistants. Current projects include studies of LGBT and sexual harassment discrimination complaints, employment diversity in Silicon Valley Tech firms, Black and Hispanic access to living wage jobs. Funding is currently available for two years.

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