by Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has opened with the Federal Register a second and final 20 day comment period on the expansion of private sector employer data collection to include pay data. These pay data will make it possible for social scientists, the EEOC and other regulators to observe workplace specific gender and racial pay gaps.

Please go to the Federal Register and submit your recommendations.

In the first comment period social scientists were almost entirely absent. The business community, however, were quite active arguing that these data were not needed, overly burdensome, or with little value. In fact, there are no alternative general population workplace level sources of data on earnings inequalities for the U.S., the burden is light because most employers have digitized personnel systems already capable of producing these data, and the value to the regulatory and scientific community are immense.

I am asking all social scientists who understand the importance of identifying the organizational sources of pay inequalities to weigh in during this second and last comment period. You can read the proposed data collection, previous comments and weigh in with your expert opinion here:

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/07/14/2016-16692/agency-information-collection-activities-notice-of-submission-for-omb-review-final-comment-request

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Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
May 31 – June 3, 2017

Our conference theme, “Class Struggle: Race, Gender, and Revolution,” seeks to take stock of the legacy, present, and future possibilities of the idea of “class struggle.” We invite proposals for individual papers, panels, plenary sessions, or cultural events that will investigate the myriad ways in which the working classes can fight for emancipation. In particular, the program committee seeks proposals that offer creative interrogations of the very concepts of “working class” and “class struggle” in today’s moment of global capitalism and the consequent disarticulation of traditional notions of the working class. What does working class mean in an era of deindustrialization, precarious work, and predatory capital mobility? What new sites of working-class struggle can come to the fore with the weakening of trade unions and the erosion of the shop-floor and public space as places of working-class organization and contestation?

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The Department of Sociology at the University of California, Davis, invites applicants for a tenure- track position for scholars whose central research focus is sociology of race and ethnicity. This recruitment is conducted at the rank of Assistant Professor (salary commensurate with experience). The resulting hire will be at the assistant rank regardless of the proposed appointee’s qualifications. We seek a scholar with a strong commitment to research and teaching. Teaching duties include four courses per academic year (quarter system) at the introductory, advanced undergraduate, and graduate level.

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DSC_5265_color_smTaekjin Shin is currently serving on the OOW Section Council.  Shin is an Assistant Professor in the College of Business Administration at San Diego State University (SDSU).  Before joining SDSU, Shin was an Assistant Professor in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  He received his Ph.D in sociology in 2008 from the University of California at Berkeley.

Shin’s research interests concern corporate governance, executive compensation, wage inequality, organizational sociology, and economic sociology. He is currently studying the institutional explanation for the rise of executive compensation and the symbolic effect of shareholder-value orientation on the career outcomes of executive managers.  Below, Shin expands upon his research and his professional experiences for the newsletter.

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The ASA Rose Series in Sociology, a book series published by the Russell Sage Foundation, is seeking book proposals. The Rose Series publishes cutting-edge, highly visible, and accessible books that offer synthetic analyses of existing fields, challenge prevailing paradigms, and/or offer fresh views on enduring controversies. Books published in the Series reach a broad audience of sociologists, other social scientists, and policymakers.

Please submit a 1-page summary & CV to: Lee Clarke, rose.series@sociology.rutgers.edu.

For more information, visit http://www.asanet.org/research-publications/rose-series-sociology.

 

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