Call for Papers: Journal of Sociology special issue on inequalities in the gig economy

Special edition of the Journal of Sociology 2019 on inequalities in the gig economy era: gender and generation challenges edited by Brendan Churchill, Signe Ravn and Lyn Craig, University of Melbourne. The special edition will focus on the intersecting implications for gender and generational inequalities in the ‘gig economy’ era, a term which we use to describe the contemporary labour market characterised by precarious employment and new (digital) forms of job seeking and entrepreneurship that expose workers to greater financial risks, social insecurities and inequalities. It will also consider the gendered dimensions of educational participation outcomes in the light of these changed labour market conditions. Deadline for submission of a 300-word abstract for consideration: 8 April 2018. More details:

Job Posting: Postdoc at the Center for Employment Equity, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

The Center for Employment Equity, University of Massachusetts, Amherst is searching for a Post-Doc researcher.  The position has primary responsibility to manage the development of a user friendly data platform to give citizens – job seekers, economic developers, employers, journalists, activists, etc. – access to EEOC data on employment quality and discrimination complaints. Tasks will include developing a series of reports on employment equity and a linked web based data platform aimed at broad dissemination of employment equity data to various publics. The core data for this project are contemporary employer reports on private and public sector employers generated by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission as well as individual discrimination complaints to the EEOC. Initial work on developing the data portal and initial reports are nearing completion. Future work will focus primarily on both policy oriented and basic science research and research dissemination. You will work closely with the project PIs and one or more Ph.D. level research assistants. Current projects include studies of LGBT and sexual harassment discrimination complaints, employment diversity in Silicon Valley Tech firms, Black and Hispanic access to living wage jobs. Funding is currently available for two years.

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New Member Publication: Lemmon, Patterson and Martin on Mothers’ Time and Relationship with Adolescent Children

Congratulations to Megan Lemmon, Sarah E. Patterson and Molly A Martin on their new publication in the Journal of Family Issues.  OOW members may find the new article to be of interest:

Lemmon, Megan, Patterson, Sarah E., and Molly A. Martin. Online First. Mothers’ Time and Relationship with their Adolescent Children: The Intersecting Influence of Family Structure and Maternal Labor Force Participation.  Journal of Family Issues.  

Job Posting: Postdoctoral Fellowships at Washington University in St. Louis

The Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government and Public Policy is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization at Washington University in St. Louis that combines academic research with public policy analyses. The Center’s unique leadership team is comprised of a leading political scientist, a renowned economist, and a prominent business leader. The Center was created in 1975 as the Center for the Study of American Business under the direction of Murray Weidenbaum and renamed in his honor in 2001. The mission of the Center is to serve as a bridge between policymakers and scholars by supporting scholarly research, public affairs programs, and other activities at the intersection of government and business — addressing some of the most important public policy issues facing America.

The Center is pleased to announce a new postdoctoral position to begin Summer of 2018.

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International Society for Justice Research Conference

The biennial conference of the International Society for Justice Research ( will be held July 25-28, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. The hosts (Emory University, in conjunction with Georgia State University and the University of Georgia) invite submissions. The theme, Interrogating Injustice, will highlight issues related to race and to the distribution of health care resources. Scholars from an array of disciplines whose work touches upon social justice concerns from both basic and applied perspectives are encouraged to submit their research for presentation as individual papers, posters, or paper symposia (that include 3-5 related papers from different scholars). Submissions close March 15, 2018. For submission and other conference details (e.g., registration, accommodations, travel), please visit

How work ethnographers are adapting to the changing nature of work

As part of our March newsletter, Benjamin Snyder comments on how ethnographers of work are responding to changes in the character of labor and employment.  Snyder is the author of The Disrupted Workplace (Oxford University Press, 2016) and a Lecturer in Sociology & Social Policy at Victoria University of Wellington.  He will join the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Williams College in Fall 2018.  

In 2001, Stephen Barley and Gideon Kunda called upon organizational and work sociologists to revisit the field’s core concepts. Time, place, schedule, wage, job, career, employment, management, ownership, head versus hand, work versus leisure, and a host of other taken for granted ways of describing economic life under bureaucratic organizing, they argued, are increasingly obscured by new post-industrial forms. They prescribed a return to an older tradition of detailed ethnographic studies of work and workplaces to adapt to the changing times. Sit with working people. Watch what they do. Listen to what work means to them. Build new concepts. For ethnographically inclined sociologists of my generation, for whom this call was part of our introduction to the field in graduate school, this message felt like a warm welcome. Many of us took up the invitation. When I look out on the field now, almost two decades later, I get the sense that the seed Barley and Kunda planted has begun to bear fruit. Work-oriented ethnographers are deeply engaged in this much needed conceptual reconstruction.

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