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W. Richard (Dick) Scott together with Michael W. Kirst and other colleagues have completed a book on HIGHER EDUCATION AND SILICON VALLEY, to be published summer of 2017 by John Hopkins University Press.  The book focuses on higher education as an organization field and also considers colleges as part of the regional economic field of Silicon Valley.  They take a longitudinal view, reviewing changes since 1970, and also examine the efforts of a sample of 16 diverse colleges to adapt to conflicting pressures stemming from an attempt to abide by academic norms and also respond to economic challenges.

SocArXiv will host the inaugural O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium on October 26-27, 2017 at University of Maryland, College Park. We invite social science papers or presentations related to the following themes:

  1. Research on any topic that includes open scholarship components. This may entail a demonstration case showing how to do an open scholarship project, providing data and code for results, working with collaborators, or other examples of open scholarship in practice.
  2. Research about open scholarship itself. This may include mechanisms for making data and code public, workflow processes, publication considerations, citation metrics, or the tools and methods of open scholarship.
  3. Research about replication and transparency. This includes both replication studies and research about replication and reproducibility issues.

Travel stipends of $1,000 will be available to a limited number of presenters.

Submissions are due by June 1, 2017. Visit https://socy.umd.edu/centers/socarxiv-o3s-conference for details.

Contact: socarxiv@gmail.com

Social Currents is seeking a new editor or editorial team to begin a three year term that will run from January 1, 2019-December 31, 2022, with the transition between editorial offices beginning summer 2018. Social Currents is the official journal of the Southern Sociological Society and publishes six issues a year. The journal is a broad-ranging social science journal that focuses on cutting-edge research from all methodological and theoretical orientations with implications for national and international sociological communities. The uniqueness of Social Currents lies in its format. The front end of every issue is devoted to short, theoretical, agenda-setting contributions and brief, empirical and policy-related pieces. The back end of every issue includes standard journal articles that cover topics within specific subfields of sociology, as well as across the social sciences more broadly. Currently the journal accepts about 15% of its submissions and receives approximately 225-250 submissions per year.
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The OOW Section Award information is now up on the website.  Nominations for the Max Weber Book Award, the W. Richard Scott Article Award, the James D. Thompson Graduate Student Paper Award and the Distinguished Career Award are due March 31, 2017.  More information about each can be found at the links below:

EGOS 2017 Conference – Copenhagen, Denmark

Subtheme 32: “Organizations as Open Polities – Struggles in the ‘Good Organization’”

We invite you to submit a paper abstract to the sub-theme on “Organizations as Open Polities – Struggles in the ‘Good Organization’” at the European Group of Organization Studies’ (EGOS) 33rd annual colloquium in Copenhagen, Denmark. The conference will take place on July 6-8, 2017.

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Please see the following announcement about a potential conference of interest:

Critical Management Studies Conference 2017
July 3 – 5, Liverpool, England
https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/business/cms2017/ 

Stream: Heroes and heroism

Stream chairs: Edward Granter & Leo McCann, University of Manchester, Des Williamson, University of Surrey.

‘Heroes do not receive material rewards for their hardships. Heroes must be willing to downplay their own exceptional abilities. Heroes abide by norms of anonymity; they must avoid being recognized as heroes’ (Adapted from Lois, 1999: 123)

This call for papers seeks contributions from a range of disciplines, which interrogate the nature of heroes and heroism in organizations and society. Recognising, after Lois, that ‘heroes’ often avoid identification, and that the nature of heroism is heavily mediated by emotional, organizational and cultural dimensions, how then can we define it – what makes work and workers heroic? Who, for Critical Management scholars and more widely, are our heroes? Do we have any? Can we have any? Why, if at all, do organizations possess or require heroes?

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