New Organizational Sociology Papers at Sociology Compass

As a section editor at Sociology Compass, I have been motivated by concerns expressed by some sociologists about the future of organizational sociology, as discussed on the Work in Progress blog in 2015. Accordingly, I have been commissioning a series of pieces that articulate the contribution of organizational sociology and its relevance to the study of core sociology sociological topics like as race, gender, and inequality, among others. A few of these pieces have been published so far. First, Heather Haveman and Rachel Wetts have published articles here  and here  that address the question “What is organizational sociology?” Elizabeth Gorman and Sarah Mosseri have published an article here that answers the question “Why should students and scholars who are interested in gender difference and inequality study organizations?”

-Eric Dahlin

ILR Review: March 2019 Issue in Honor of Henry Farber

Dear Friends,

We are very pleased to publish this special issue in honor of Henry Farber’s contributions to the field of labor economics and as a longstanding author of articles in the ILR Review.  Many thanks to Orley Ashenfelter and Alexandre Mas for guest editing this special issue.  It features papers that were presented in a spring, 2016 Festschrift in Hank’s honor, with papers that covered many areas in labor economics, including some (but not all) of the key research areas where he has contributed substantially to advancing the field:  consequences of unemployment,  the changing nature of employment relations, and the role of unions.  Contributions from leading labor economists include: Katharine Abraham, Ran Abramitzky, Leah Boustan, Mark Chin, Katherine Eriksson, Deepti Goel, John Haltiwanger, Thomas Kane, Lawrence Katz, Alan Krueger, Whitney Kozakowski, Kevin Lang, Craig Olson, Paul Oyer, Douglas Staiger, Kristin Sandusky, Scott Schaefer, Beth Schueler, and James R. Spletzer.

From the editors,

Rose Batt and Larry Kahn

Continue reading “ILR Review: March 2019 Issue in Honor of Henry Farber”

Member Publications

Please check out the following recent publications from OOW members, Robert Perrucci and Carolyn C Perrucci, and collegaues.  

Robert Perrucci, Carolyn C. Perrucci, andMangala Subramaniam, “From Little Science to Big Science: Were Women andNon-Elites Left Out?” Archives ofPsychology, Volume 1, Issue 1, October 2017:41-45.

Carolyn C. Perrucci and Robert Perrucci, “NewEconomy,” in George Ritzer (ed.) WileyBlackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, 2nd Edition, April 2018.John Wiley & Sons: Oxford, UK.

Richard Hogan and Carolyn Cummings Perrucci, “WeKnow about Reagan, but Was There a Clinton Effect? Earnings by Race, Gender,Marital and Family Status, 1993 and 2000.” CriticalSociology (Online First) First Published October 4, 2018.

https://doi-org.exproxy.lib.purdue.edu/10.1177/0896920518798081

A Brief Report on Research in the Sociology of Work

Steven Vallas, Northeastern University

Sociologists studying work, organizations, and economic institutions will already know about Research in the Sociology of Work, sponsored by OOW for several years now. Here’s brief report on recent events. Now using a hybrid model, RSW is open to both general-topic submissions in the field and to papers responding to thematic calls for special issues.

Continue reading “A Brief Report on Research in the Sociology of Work”

New Member Publication: Doering on Personal Ties in Microfinance

OOW members may be interested in this new publication from Laura Doering at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto:

Doering, Laura. 2018. “Risk, Returns and Relational Lending: Personal Ties in Microfinance.” American Journal of Sociology 123(5):1341–81.

Personal relationships often facilitate credit transactions. However, existing research holds different expectations about whether personal ties prove detrimental or beneficial for lenders. Economic sociology highlights the advantages lenders accrue when they have personal ties with borrowers. Yet research from social psychology suggests that personal ties can be costly because lenders may “escalate commitment” to poor performers. This study uses data from a microfinance bank to ask: When are personal relationships detrimental or beneficial for lenders? It shows that lenders with personal ties to borrowers are less likely to cut those ties and their borrowers miss fewer payments. However, these trends vary with frequency of contact. When lenders and borrowers interact infrequently, lenders continue to show strong commitment, but borrowers become less compliant, creating potential problems for lenders. This study integrates theories from economic sociology and social psychology to offer a more nuanced, temporally informed understanding of personal ties in finance.