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Publications

A note from the editor of Research in the Sociology of Work

OOW members will be pleased to learn a few things about RSW, one of the section’s two scholarly outlets (sister of Research in the Sociology of Organizations, edited by Michael Lounsbury).

Volume 30 of RSW, entitled Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management, and the Labor Market, has just been published. It contains articles on a wide array of themes and topics, including organizational change in health care organizations, the workings of internal labor markets in the financial industry, the link between management rhetoric and corporate downsizing, racial disparities at work after the great recession, and the authority systems found in UK call centers.

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W. Richard (Dick) Scott together with Michael W. Kirst and other colleagues have completed a book on HIGHER EDUCATION AND SILICON VALLEY, to be published summer of 2017 by John Hopkins University Press.  The book focuses on higher education as an organization field and also considers colleges as part of the regional economic field of Silicon Valley.  They take a longitudinal view, reviewing changes since 1970, and also examine the efforts of a sample of 16 diverse colleges to adapt to conflicting pressures stemming from an attempt to abide by academic norms and also respond to economic challenges.

Work and Occupations has recently published a special issue on “Making Jobs Better” (Volume 44, Number 1).  Please find the table of contents & article descriptions below.

Daniel B. Cornfield (Vanderbilt University) is the current editor of Work and Occupations. The journal can be accessed at: journals.sagepub.com/home/wox and manuscripts can be submitted at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/wox

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We’re pleased to announce the release of an ILR Review special issue on workplace inequality — offering important theoretical and practical insights for efforts to reduce inequality in organizations. Many thanks to guest editors Pamela S. Tolbert and Emilio J. Castilla.  Papers in the issue empirically examine the efficacy of a range of practices to reduce racial and gender disparities in hiring, promotion, and compensation.  They also identify key contingencies that affect the relationship between organizational practices and outcomes, showing differences in effects for women and minorities, for members at different hierarchical levels, and for members drawn from internal or external labor markets.

Rose Batt and Larry Kahn, Editors

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RSW is happy to report that two featured articles in the current issue of RSW can be freely accessed on the publisher’s website. Below are the titles and abstracts. The first is Robin Leidner’s study of actors holding “survival jobs,” and struggling to maintain their identities as professional actors. The other is David Orzechowicz’s study of a seemingly gay-friendly work culture at a well-known amusement park. Both are provocative pieces that make for interesting reading.  The links should work, or simply point your browser here and scroll for the papers: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/book/10.1108/S0277-2833201629

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OOW Section member, Carolyn Perrucci, has recently published a new journal article on publishing trends in sociological journals:

Robert Perrucci, Mangala Subramaniam and Carolyn C. Perrucci, “Who Publishes in Leading Sociology Journals, 1965-2010?” Pages 77- 86 in Earl Wright II and Thomas C. Calhoun (eds.), What To Expect and How to Respond: Distress and Success in Academia. Rowman and Littlefield: 2016.

Section member, Kumiko Nemoto, recently published a new book: Too Few Women at the Top: The Persistence of Inequality in Japan (ILR/Cornell University Press, 2016)

Abstract

The number of women in positions of power and authority in Japanese companies has remained small despite the increase in the number of educated women and the passage of legislation on gender equality. In Too Few Women at the Top, Kumiko Nemoto draws on theoretical insights regarding Japan’s coordinated capitalism and institutional stasis to challenge claims that the surge in women’s education and employment will logically lead to the decline of gender inequality and eventually improve women’s status in the Japanese workplace.

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