International Society for Justice Research Conference

The biennial conference of the International Society for Justice Research (https://www.isjr.org/) will be held July 25-28, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. The hosts (Emory University, in conjunction with Georgia State University and the University of Georgia) invite submissions. The theme, Interrogating Injustice, will highlight issues related to race and to the distribution of health care resources. Scholars from an array of disciplines whose work touches upon social justice concerns from both basic and applied perspectives are encouraged to submit their research for presentation as individual papers, posters, or paper symposia (that include 3-5 related papers from different scholars). Submissions close March 15, 2018. For submission and other conference details (e.g., registration, accommodations, travel), please visit http://sociology.emory.edu/isjr2018.

SASE Miniconference on Inequality in Organizations

OOW members are strongly encouraged to submit abstracts for the SASE (Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics) Mini-Conference “Prospects of Equality Within and Across Organizations” organized by Nina Bandelj, Andrew Penner and Donald Tomaskovic-Devey during the SASE Annual meeting in Kyoto, Japan, June 23-25, 2018.

Deadline for submission: *January 29, 2018*
Continue reading “SASE Miniconference on Inequality in Organizations”

Labor and Labor Movements ASA Panels of Interest

OOW members are encouraged to submit to the following sections organized by the Labor and Labor Movements Section:

Race and labor and the 50th anniversary of the Memphis Strike
In February 1968, 1,300 black Memphis sanitation workers struck for safer jobs, better pay, and union recognition, carrying signs that said “I am a man”.  Rev. Martin Luther King visited Memphis repeatedly to support the strike, and on one of those visits, on April 4, 1968, he was assassinated.  Despite vicious union-busting by the city government, the workers went on to win the strike.

Continue reading “Labor and Labor Movements ASA Panels of Interest”

Gender, Professions and Organizations Writing Workshop

The 14th semi-annual Gender, Professions, and Organizations Writing Workshop will take place from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm on Thursday, January 25th 2018 – the day of the opening reception for the Sociologists for Women in Society winter meetings in Atlanta, Georgia.

The workshop was originally intended for sociologists who are doing research on gender and academic careers, scientific workplace organizations, organizational transformations to promote gender equality, etc. It has been broadened to include gender, professional work, and organizational change. The purpose of the workshop is to learn about the range of work attendees are doing, to facilitate collaboration and to set aside time for writing.

We encourage new and returning participants. If you’ve never come, welcome, and if you have, welcome back! If it turns out that you can’t come, please let one of us know; conversely, if you know of someone who has been considering joining us, encourage contacting one of us a.s.a.p. We will make a reservation for lunch for the full group; while this is an enjoyable part of the day, participants may opt to use the hour and a half for other activities.

Continue reading “Gender, Professions and Organizations Writing Workshop”

Call for Abstracts: The Sociology of International Organizations

Planned Preconference to the ASA Annual Meeting:
“Feeling Race—An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions”
August 10, 2018

Pre-conference Theme

At a time when globalization is increasingly contested in practice and scholarship, the rise of anti-globalization forces has cast the spotlight on the successes, failures and limitations of international organizations (IOs), ubiquitous actors which structure the institutional environment underpinning world economic, environmental and social affairs.

Political science has dominated the study of IOs. Yet, in recent years, a distinctive sociology of international organizations is emerging. It crosses over such diverse subfields as global and transnational sociology, economic sociology, sociologies of law and culture, organizations and professions. It variously focuses on markets and rights, health and finance, terrorism and development, among many other issues. Its theoretical and methodological variants reflect wider orientations in our discipline. Despite the promise of this diversity, however, strands of work on IOs in sociology have not adequately been brought into productive conversation with each other.

This year’s Annual Meeting theme “Feeling Race—An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions” offers opportunities to expand the sociology of international organizations in new directions. Neither in political science nor sociology has adequate attention been given to the structures of domination and race that permeate the transnational and global. Further, while emotion is salient in the decision-making and implementation of global governance, it has been little explored. Yet, it might offer a powerful sociological counterpoint to the rational actor, rational design and international political economy theories so prominent in political science and international relations.

Continue reading “Call for Abstracts: The Sociology of International Organizations”

Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment

Critical Practice in an Age of Complexity

Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment. Conference
Place: University of Arizona, Tucson
Dates: 22 – 23 February 2018
Abstract Deadline: 05 Dec 2017
http://architecturemps.com/arizona/

Context:
Donald Trump promises investment in infrastructure, China continues to urbanize, global cities are surrounded by slums and housing is unaffordable while simultaneously a form of capital investment.

The issues of living in the United States cities, towns and communities are more than just questions of the buildings we construct; the houses we make or the roads we build. The built environment reflects and informs social development, community conflict and economic opportunity, demographic disparity and more. To understand this complex relationship we need to think across discipline boundaries.

Disciplines:
Sociology, human geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning and more.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment”

Call for Papers: EGOS Sub-theme on the Impact of Organizational Practices on Career Outcomes

Call for Papers

At the core of research in organization studies lays the premise that organizations play a key role in generating and sustaining inequality in the workplace. For example, many studies show that women and racial minorities occupy lower quality jobs, through processes of screening, hiring, promotion, and termination. Recent empirical work has found that gender and racial disparities in the workplace remain even after the adoption of diversity programs, problem-solving team and job-training arrangements, merit-based pay practices, and other work policies. Other studies have also examined how structural factors internal to organizations, such as organizational size and tenure, hierarchical structure, and the use of job categories, affect ascriptive inequality. Ultimately, the distribution of resources, power and opportunities in society cannot be fully understood without paying attention to the impact of organizations and their practices on individual work outcomes.

The purpose of this sub-theme is to bring together a group of researchers who share a concern for advancing our knowledge about the impact of organizational practices on workplace inequality and diversity. In particular, our goal is to discuss innovative research that sheds new light on surprising theoretical mechanisms that explain how organizational practices affect key employment outcomes – such as assignment to jobs, wages, promotions, career advancement, training opportunities, etc. Because the nature of organizations and their boundaries are changing so rapidly, talking about “organizational practices” may not be the ideal way of thinking about these issues any more. Thus we also would like to explore the blurring of organizational boundaries, values, and procedures, the recent patterns of employee mobility, the increasing use of “market-driven” employment practices and the use of technology in the employment domain. We aim to examine how these developments shape new forms of economic and social inequality. This topic is not only relevant for the advancement of organizational theory and research, but it also has practical implications for employees, managers, communities, and society as a whole.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: EGOS Sub-theme on the Impact of Organizational Practices on Career Outcomes”