Call for Abstracts: The Role of Consumption in Linking Local Economies to Global Value Chains

Dear Colleagues,
 
Please consider submitting an English-language abstract for the session “The Role of Consumption in Linking Local Economies to Global Value Chains: The Case of Food Markets” hosted by the Research Committee on “Economy and Society” (RC02) at the IVth ISA Forum of Sociology on “Challenges of the 21st Century: Democracy, Environment, Inequalities, Intersectionality” (14.-18.07.2020, Porto Alegre, Brazil).
 
Discussion in the session starts from the observation that consumption is usually locally bound and an intrinsical part of local economies. At the same time, it plays a large role for expressing local identities and reinforcing local social inequality via distinguished consumption practices. At the same time, as e.g. Economics of Convention have shown, consumer-producer-interactions shape the form and structure of global value chains and thus link and integrate local economies into global value chains. Approaches such as World Systems Analysis have shown that the positioning within these global chains strongly influences global inequality.
 
The session thus explores the role of consumption in linking local economies to global value chains and (re-)production of global inequalities. While the session focus will be on food markets, case studies on other markets are also welcome. 
 
For further information on the conference, see: https://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/forum/porto-alegre-2020
 
If you are interested in giving a presentation, please submit an English-language abstract by 30.09.2019 via Confex: https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session13905.html
 
Best wishes,
Nina Baur, Linda Hering and Julia Fülling
(Session Organizers)

OOW Mentoring Meet-Up

The Organizations, Occupations, and Work Section will be organizing a mentoring meet-up at this year’s ASA meeting where graduate students, post-docs, and faculty can enjoy a discussion about shared research interests outside of the scheduling of the regular conference.  If you are interested in participating, please complete the form at the following link by May 17th.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe-Yawej5re1mG4ZodnmHv1bclBszvS-FzbY5uZIaCL8M4p7w/viewform?usp=sf_link

The OOW Mentoring Committee (Sharla Alegria, Nina Bandelj, Emily Barman, Tim Bartley, and Jennifer Bouek) will match up junior and senior scholars based on shared research interests.  Matched mentors and mentees should then reach out to each other to find a mutually convenient time to meet during the ASA.

If you have questions or concerns, please be in touch with Emily Barman (eabarman@bu.edu). Thank you.

Call for Papers: International Conference on “Solidarity at Work”

Working Futures
International Conference on “Solidarity at Work”

14-15 November 2019
Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin

Deadline for submission: 30 April 2019

Launched in 2018 by the Wissenschaftskolleg and the International Research Center Work and Human Life Cycle in Global History (re:work), the transnational network Working Futures brings together sociologists, historians, philosophers, economists, law experts and anthropologists to discuss current transformations in the world of work and the epistemological challenges they raise for the historical and social sciences. The goal of the network is to create a space for mutual exchange and understanding with respect to the futures of work, as well as work of the future, among scholars from different disciplines and countries while centered around a Franco-German nucleus. It endorses the premise that thinking about the futures of work requires an in-depth knowledge and analysis of its contemporary mutations (the concrete forms they take, their causes and repercussions). To this end, the network has developed an approach which examines the transformations of work at the intersection of four processes: siliconization, financialization, ecologization and democratization.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: International Conference on “Solidarity at Work””

Announcements from ASA

ASA-Wide and Section Elections

Ballots for the 2019 ASA -wide and Section election will be distributed to eligible members in April 2019. Ballots will be sent out via email from Sociological.ballot@intelliscaninc.net.  Please add this email address to the permitted senders list on your spam filter to ensure timely delivery of your ballot. Voting will close at 5 p.m. eastern on Friday, May 31, 2019. 
The last day to join ASA or a section to participate in the election is March 31. Please encourage all section members to participate in the election. For general information on the election, please visit www.asanet.org/election.

 

Accessibility is for Everyone: How to Rock Your ASA Presentation and Make it Inclusive

Angela Frederick and Laura Mauldin have written an excellent and practical guide for giving inclusive presentations. Please share this with section session organizers and presenters.

Call for Session Organizers at the International Sociological Association’s Forum of Sociology

Porto Alegre, Brazil, July 2020. Deadline 15 March 2019.

The International Sociological Association’s next Forum of Sociology will be held in Porto Alegre, Brazil from July 14-18, 2020. TheEconomy and Society Research Committee (ISA RC02) is issuing an open call for proposals to organize sessions on topics related to economy and society. The online session proposal submission system is open from 4 February through 15 March 2019, 24:00 GMT. Please note that the deadline is set by ISA and is inflexible. To submit a proposal, you will first need to register an account with the International Sociological Association. You may then submit a proposal here: https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/rc/sessions/index.cgi?symposiumid=568

For any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Aaron Pitluck, President of the Economy and Society Research Committee, at Aaron.Pitluck@IllinoisState.edu

Call for Papers: Wharton Conference on Migration, Organizations, and Management

The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

May 30-31, 2019

Organizers:

  • Prithwiraj Choudhury, Harvard Business School
  • Exequiel Hernandez, The Wharton School
  • Elena Kulchina, Duke University
  • Dan Wang, Columbia University

Migration, or the movement of people across national borders for either permanent or temporary settlement, is one of the defining issues of our time. Despite its importance, migration has not been emphasized in the study of management and organizations. Existing research from other disciplines has focused on “macro” or policy issues. For instance, many studies explore whether low-skill immigrants affect the employment and wages of native workers (Card, 1990; Borjas, 1994; Peri and Sparber, 2009). Other work focuses on how high-skill immigrants create clusters of knowledge and entrepreneurship at the regional or national level (Saxenian, 2006; Kerr, 2019). Yet other research focuses on the role migration plays in cross-border trade and investment (Gould, 1994; Leblang, 2010). These precedents suggest that migration is an important factor affecting the mobility of labor, knowledge, and capital – i.e., the very resources upon which organizations and their managers rely to survive, grow, and innovate.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Wharton Conference on Migration, Organizations, and Management”

Call for Papers: “Formal Organization Today” EGOS Colloquium Sub-theme

European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS)

35th EGOS Colloquium

“Formal Organization Today: Reconnecting with the Classics” (sub-theme 45)

Edinburgh (UK), 4-6 July 2019

Convenors:

Call for Papers

Concepts and discussions on classic organizational authors currently seem to be relegated to the pages of manuals and history books (Adler, 2009). In particular, formal organizational dynamics (e.g., bureaucracy, staff-line relations, work formalization) occupy a secondary role in the current literature (du Gay & Vikkelsø, 2016). Most contemporary studies explore societal matters, work interactions, and new organizational forms, while leaving formal organizational aspects — which were once core in our discipline — in the background. In part, this state of affairs is due to the development of the field which has been enriched by new themes and approaches (Lounsbury & Beckman, 2015). Yet, we also suffer from a ‘novelty bias’ and at times do not pause to explore how new ideas fit within the canons of our discipline (Barley, 2015).

The goal of this sub-theme is to stimulate an appraisal for our fundamental object of inquiry: formal organizations.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: “Formal Organization Today” EGOS Colloquium Sub-theme”