Job Posting: Assistant Project Scientist in Technology Management

The Technology Management Program at UC Santa Barbara seeks applications for an Assistant Project Scientist position. This Assistant Project Scientist will assist Prof. Matt Beane with a field-based research project. The project scientist will do research, data collection, and project analysis independently and in conjunction with Prof. Beane on this and potentially other projects of mutual interest.

The project that this position will be working on is a multi-year, multi-method research study of the implications of AI-enabled robotic systems for workers and organizations in high-mix, repetitive, manual work. Phase one centers on hypothesis generation, and involves fieldwork across numerous pick-and-pack driven (e.g. secondary fulfillment) facilities distributed around the US that are automating this work via AI-enabled robotic systems. As part of this fieldwork we are collecting and producing a significant body of quantitative data on organizational performance. Phase two of this work will involve testing these hypotheses via the US Census, and phase three will involve field experiments.

The minimum qualification is having a doctorate or equivalent at time of application. Preferred qualifications include having experience conducting research on work involving complex technology. Preference will be given to applicants with research interests in learning and labor relations, familiarity with production data and who are empirically focused on AI and/or robotics. The successful candidate will demonstrate competencies indicating that they will be able to contribute high-level skills to the projects at hand, and enable, plan, or execute research alongside TMP faculty. This appointment is 100% time for one year, with possibility of extension based upon performance/availability of funds.

To apply, please go to the following link: https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/JPF01756.

Applicants should submit curriculum vitae, statement of research experience, and contact information for 3 references. Complete and submit your application by 3/16/2020 for primary consideration. Ideally, we are looking for someone to start early May 2020.

The Department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Call for Papers: International Conference “Rethinking the free time/work time divide”

The conference will take place on October 8-9, 2020, at Université Paris-Est Créteil, France
Proposals (300-word abstract + short biography) should be submitted by April 1, 2020
Participants will be notified in June 2020

In a seminal article entitled “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism” (1967), the historian E. P. Thompson analyzed the evolution of the concept of time in British society in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He demonstrated the importance of incorporating the question of time into the study of the transformations that took place in the organization of labor during industrialization. Subsequently, scholars have questioned the ways in which temporal norms in work contexts have
changed over the past two centuries. For example, historians of labor have highlighted the role of trade unions in organizing the length of work hours since the end of the nineteenth century, while sociologists of labor have been particularly interested in definitions of “work” and the issue of measuring and managing the time that our contemporary societies devote to work.

Like others, E. P. Thompson also noted that the concept of time and its evolutions are issues that do not only concern work. The time devoted to hobbies, sports, holidays, entertainment, or tourism has become inherent to the study of free time. For example, social history has documented its institutionalization, as well as the practice of leisure and vacation in British or North American societies from the nineteenth century to the present day. Following in the tracks of Robert Stebbins, who coined the concept of “serious leisure”, some sociologists have renewed the theory of leisure practices.

Building on studies of volunteer work or “gray areas” of employment on the one hand, and of workers’ leisure practices on the other, this conference proposes to combine work time and free time in the English-speaking world in order to explore their various definitions, redefinitions and the ways in which they have interacted over the centuries. This means considering the ways in which these two temporalities have changed and hybridized each other, generating tensions or new forms of balance or complementarity. How has legislation in different countries regulated free time and labor time? To what extent have new practices of work and leisure blurred the boundaries between these two temporalities? How have different perceptions of the private and professional spheres changed the way people think about and experience work and leisure time?

For this conference, we invite researchers in the various disciplines of the humanities and economic and social sciences to consider the following topics and approaches:

  • Mapping the intersections of research on free time and work time.
  • Philosophical approaches to work and leisure.
  • Images and representations.
  • Hybrid forms of work (volunteer work, charity work, activism, “gray areas” of employment…).
  • Social conflicts, mobilization, and labor rights.
  • Gender and the organization of work.
  • Recreational practices in the workplace.
  • Boundaries, liminality, and intersections.
  • Methodological and archival particularities.

This conference is organized by Sonia Birocheau and Fabienne Moine (Université Paris-Est Créteil, France).

The scholars on the scientific committee are Fabrice Bensimon (Sorbonne Université, France), Karine Chambefort (Université Paris-Est Créteil, France), Neil Davie (Université Lumière Lyon 2, France), Yannick Deschamps (Université Paris-Est Créteil, France), Jessica Dunkin (University of Alberta, Canada), Emma Griffin (University of East Anglia, United Kingdom), Donna Kesselman (Université Paris-Est Créteil, France), John Krinsky (City College of New York, United States), Olaf Stieglitz (University of Cologne, Germany).

Submission of proposals and contact: sonia.birocheau@u-pec.fr and fabienne.moine@u-pec.fr

References:
Cindy S. Aron, Working at Play: A History of Vacations in the United States, New York, Oxford University Press, 1999.
Peter Bailey, Leisure and Class in Victorian England: Rational Recreation and the Contest for Control, 1830- 1885, London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978.
Peter Bailey, “Leisure, Culture, and the Historian: Reviewing the First Generation of Leisure Historiography in Britain”, Leisure Studies 8:2, 1989, 107-127.
Jean-Yves Boulin, Tiphaine de Rocquigny and Jean Viard. L’économie du temps libre (4/4). Le travail à l’assaut des loisirs. Entendez-vous l’éco? France culture, December 20, 2018. 58’.
Marie-Christine Bureau and Patrick Dieuaide, “Institutional Change and Transformations in Labour and Employment Standards: An Analysis of ‘Grey Zones’”, Transfer: European Review of Labor and Research, 24:3, August 2018, 261-277.
Hugh Cunningham, Time, Work and Leisure: Life Changes in England since 1700, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2014.
John Krinsky and Maud Simonet, “La servitude et le volontaire : les usages politiques du travail invisible dans les parcs de la ville de New York”, Sociétés contemporaines 2012/3 (n°87), 49-74.
Catriona M. Paratt, “Little Means or Time: Working-Class Women and Leisure in Late Victorian and Edwardian England”, The International Journal of the History of Sport 15:2, August 1998, 22-53.
Robert A. Stebbins, “Serious Leisure: A Conceptual Statement”, The Pacific Sociological Review 25:2, April 1982, 251-272.
Tim Strangleman, “Representations of Labour: Visual Sociology and Work”, Sociology Compass 2:5, 2008, 1491-1505.
E. P. Thompson, “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism”, Past and Present 38, December 1967, 56-97.

Call for Papers: Contexts: Ethnographies of the Global South

Contexts is a quarterly magazine that makes cutting-edge social research accessible to general readers. The magazine is issuing a call for papers for its Winter 2021 issue, dedicated to “Ethnographies of the Global South.” This special issue will be guest edited by Victoria Reyes, assistant professor of sociology at the University of California-Riverside, and Marco Garrido, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. 

In recent years, there has been a blossoming of ethnographies on the Global South within sociology; this represents something new. Historically, American ethnographers within the discipline have plied their trade almost exclusively within the U.S. context. Casting our eye south has produced a vivid description of “foreign” social worlds.

These descriptions have proven to be a goldmine theoretically. They challenge and compel us to revise many of the analytical categories we largely take for granted, from race and segregation, to state and civil society. In making “foreign” contexts familiar, the new ethnographies of the Global South are expanding our sociological imagination in exciting ways.

We are looking for papers that embody a deeper engagement with Southern contexts. We are seeking robust descriptions of everyday life rooted in these contexts. The papers should demonstrate how detailed descriptions serve to extend not only just the empirical but also the conceptual boundaries of sociology.

We are asking that potential authors submit a two-page proposal by March 1, 2020. The editorial team will notify all authors of our decision by April 2, 2020. Authors whose proposals are accepted will need to return a full submission of approximately 3,000 words by June 1, 2020 for peer review. Articles that pass peer review will be further revised by the editorial team with final text due by September 1, 2020. Authors interested in submitting a piece are highly encouraged to read our submission guidelines.

Call for Applications: Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences

Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences: Linking Theory and Empirical Research
Berlin, July 20 – 30, 2020

We are delighted to announce the 10th edition of the Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences. The summer school aims at supporting young researchers by strengthening their ability in linking theory and empirical research. The two-week program creates an excellent basis for the development of their current research designs.

In the first week, we address the key methodological challenges of concept-building, causation/explanation, and micro-macro linkage that occur in almost all research efforts. We strive for a clarification of the epistemological foundations underlying methodological paradigms. In the second week, these methodological considerations are applied to central empirical fields of research in political science, sociology, and other related disciplines.

In this second part of the program, participants are assigned to four thematic groups according to their own research topic. The thematic areas covered are: “Global Governance & International Relations”, “Citizenship, Migration, and Identities”, “Social Struggle and Globalization”, and “Democracy at the Crossroads”.

The program is characterized by a varied format comprised of lectures, workshops, seminars, and a one-to-one consultation. During the summer school, participants will also have the opportunity to present and discuss their own work extensively. Participants will be provided with hands-on advice for their research designs.

The school brings together a faculty of renowned international and Berlin-based scholars. Among the confirmed international lecturers are Ann Swidler (UC Berkeley), David Stark (Columbia University and University of Warwick), Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale Superiore), Felix Berenskoetter (SOAS University of London), Hendrik Wagenaar (Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna and King’s College London) and Vera Troeger (University of Warwick).

The Berlin Summer School was co-funded by the Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences (BGSS) at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. Details on the location and tuition fees can be found on our webpage: www.berlinsummerschool.de

The international summer school is open to up to 60 PhD candidates, advanced master students, and young postdocs. The call for applications is currently open. Applications can be submitted online via the application form on the summer school webpage until March 22, 2020.

The decisions of the selection committee will be announced to the applicants in April. If you have any further questions, please contact the organizing team at bgsssumm@hu-berlin.de

Call for Applications: The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

UPDATE: “At Warwick we have decided to offer a free place at our Summer School on Practice and Process Studies for scholars who are affiliated with an institution based outside of Europe, North America, Australasia or East Asia, or who are resident there. We are looking to support scholars who document practices in non-traditional settings.”

The Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies

Practice, Process and Issues of Scale in Global Challenges (13-16 July, 2020)

Following on from our highly successful Summer Schools in the last seven years, we are pleased to announce the 2020 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies.

The Workshop takes place from Monday 13 July to Thursday 16 July on the University of Warwick campus, Coventry, UK. The School is programmatically multi-disciplinary and open to a variety of approaches and sensitivities. It is organised by Warwick’s Practice, Process, and Institutions (PPI) Research Programme in collaboration with the International Symposium Series on Process Organization Studies (PROS).

The variable theme of this year’s summer school focuses on the issue of Scale in Global Challenges. An increasing number of scholars is interested in studying global challenges, such as climate change, poverty, health technologies, policy making, etc. Capturing such large-scale phenomena can be a challenge for practice and process scholar:  Should we take a micro or macro lens? Where should we look? How do we connect small scale and large-scale phenomena? How about local actions and global actions? In the summer school, we will advance these discussions in two ways: We will (1) rethink the methods we use to study phenomena of societal importance, and (2) shift from scale as a category of analysis to scale as a category of practice.

This year the school is programmatically aimed at advanced PhDs students and early career scholars who already have substantial experience with process and practice approaches in their research.

Full details for the event, which includes information about the application and registration fees, can be found on our website.

To apply, please submit your application by February 28th via this link

If you have any questions please email Katharina Dittrich.

Call for Papers: Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences on:

Status: What Is It, and Why Does It Matter for Inequality?

Editors: Cecilia L. Ridgeway (Stanford University) and Hazel Rose Markus (Stanford University)

Status can be defined simply as a comparative social ranking on the basis of esteem, honor, prestige, and respect which creates a form of inequality and hierarchy among those ranked. This simple definition, however, leaves unanswered complex questions about what status really is as a social process and why scholars of inequality should be concerned with it. For instance, what do we make of evidence that concerns about status are often as or more powerful motivators for life decisions than economic incentives? Why is it that threats to status foster conflicts and undermine performance, health and well-being? And why and how does status matter for broader patterns of inequality in society based on valued life outcomes such as wealth, power, and health? The proposed issue grows from the need for a deeper story about what the nature of status inequality is and how it works that will allow us to address such questions.

In this issue, we invite theoretical and empirical papers that seek to enlarge our understanding of the nature and significance of status as a form of inequality and that illuminate the roles status plays in driving, maintaining, or changing inequality in wealth, power, or well-being in contemporary advanced industrial societies. We welcome papers from across the social sciences, including sociology, psychology, organizational behavior, economics, political science, and communications. Papers may employ a variety of methods and data from quantitative to qualitative. We are interested in papers that address any aspect of our general call but that, in particular, deepen our understanding of what status really is as a social process. In the link below we offer a list of questions and issues, organized into broad themes, that such papers might address. This list is suggestive only and is not meant to limit the topics papers might cover.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Anticipated Timeline

Prospective contributors should submit a CV and an abstract (up to two pages in length, single or double spaced) of their study along with up to two pages of supporting material (e.g., tables, figures, pictures, etc.) no later than 5 PM EST on April 7, 2020, to:

https://rsf.fluxx.io

(NOTE that if you wish to submit an abstract and do not yet have an account with us, it can take up to 48 hours to get credentials, so please start your application at least two days before the deadline.)

All submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in part or in full. Only abstracts submitted to https://rsf.fluxx.io will be considered. Each paper will receive a $1,000 honorarium when the issue is published. All questions regarding this issue should be directed to Suzanne Nichols, Director of Publications, at journal@rsage.org and not to the email addresses of the editors of the issue.

A conference will take place at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on February 26, 2021 (with a group dinner the night before). The selected contributors will gather for a one-day workshop to present draft papers (due a month prior to the conference (on 1/26/21) and receive feedback from the other contributors and editors. Travel costs, food, and lodging for one author per paper will be covered by the foundation. Papers will be circulated before the conference. After the conference, the authors will submit their revised drafts by 5/19/21. The papers will then be sent out to three additional scholars for formal peer review. Having received feedback from reviewers and the RSF board, authors will revise their papers by 11/1/21. The full and final issue will be published in the spring of 2022. Papers will be published open access on the RSF website as well as in several digital repositories, including JSTOR and UPCC/Muse.

Please click here for a full description of the topics covered in this call for articles.

Member Publication: The differential impact of network connectedness and size on researchers’ productivity and influence

Please check out the following recent publication by OOW members Tsahi Hayat, Dimitrina Dimitrova, and Barry Wellman. 2020. “The Differential Impact of Network Connectedness and Size on Researchers’ Productivity and Influence.” Information, Communication and Society 23: 5.

Abstract:

We analyze the effect of different types of online and offline ties – acquaintanceship, advice, and co-authorship – on researchers’ productivity and influence. Unlike static studies of networked work, we look at how changes in these networks affected researchers’ performance and influence. Using the number of publications as an indicator of productivity and the number of citations as an indicator of influence, we investigate when researchers were more productive and influential. We study whether their networks were cohesive, if the researchers were central in their networks or linked to central players, and whether their work had more opportunities to be disseminated through diverse, non-redundant ties. Although the connectedness of their networks was positively associated with the researchers’ productivity, it was the non-redundant effective size of the networks that was positively associated with the researchers’ influence