Call for Researchers
https://www.shawhinroudbari.com/openings

Architects, planners, and engineers mobilize to make their work more just, their institutions more equitable, and their governments more accountable. Examples include, planners protesting for housing justice, architects advocating for gender equity within their profession, and civil engineers opposing unethical infrastructure projects. I’m looking for students to join the research team.

​Through this project, we’ll seek to understand ways built-environment professionals mobilize to shape political power. We will investigate forms of dissent including advocacy, activism, protest, and other means to political empowerment.

​The project is an ethnography of design professionals that includes a study of social media as a space of formation and dissemination of discourses of dissent.

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Critical Practice in an Age of Complexity

Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment. Conference
Place: University of Arizona, Tucson
Dates: 22 – 23 February 2018
Abstract Deadline: 05 Dec 2017
http://architecturemps.com/arizona/

Context:
Donald Trump promises investment in infrastructure, China continues to urbanize, global cities are surrounded by slums and housing is unaffordable while simultaneously a form of capital investment.

The issues of living in the United States cities, towns and communities are more than just questions of the buildings we construct; the houses we make or the roads we build. The built environment reflects and informs social development, community conflict and economic opportunity, demographic disparity and more. To understand this complex relationship we need to think across discipline boundaries.

Disciplines:
Sociology, human geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning and more.

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Please join us for the 8th Annual Arizona Methods Workshops, January 4-6, 2018.

This year we will offer workshops in R, Data Science, Social Networks, Stata Programming, Field Experiments and Audit Studies, and QCA.

Graduate students can apply for the Scott R. Eliason Award, which covers all but the $50 registration fee.

Website (links to workshop descriptions, instructor bios, award application, & online registration):https://sociology.arizona.edu/methods

Flyer: https://sociology.arizona.edu/sites/sociology.arizona.edu/files/methods2018_flyer-green-email6.pdf

Call for Papers

At the core of research in organization studies lays the premise that organizations play a key role in generating and sustaining inequality in the workplace. For example, many studies show that women and racial minorities occupy lower quality jobs, through processes of screening, hiring, promotion, and termination. Recent empirical work has found that gender and racial disparities in the workplace remain even after the adoption of diversity programs, problem-solving team and job-training arrangements, merit-based pay practices, and other work policies. Other studies have also examined how structural factors internal to organizations, such as organizational size and tenure, hierarchical structure, and the use of job categories, affect ascriptive inequality. Ultimately, the distribution of resources, power and opportunities in society cannot be fully understood without paying attention to the impact of organizations and their practices on individual work outcomes.

The purpose of this sub-theme is to bring together a group of researchers who share a concern for advancing our knowledge about the impact of organizational practices on workplace inequality and diversity. In particular, our goal is to discuss innovative research that sheds new light on surprising theoretical mechanisms that explain how organizational practices affect key employment outcomes – such as assignment to jobs, wages, promotions, career advancement, training opportunities, etc. Because the nature of organizations and their boundaries are changing so rapidly, talking about “organizational practices” may not be the ideal way of thinking about these issues any more. Thus we also would like to explore the blurring of organizational boundaries, values, and procedures, the recent patterns of employee mobility, the increasing use of “market-driven” employment practices and the use of technology in the employment domain. We aim to examine how these developments shape new forms of economic and social inequality. This topic is not only relevant for the advancement of organizational theory and research, but it also has practical implications for employees, managers, communities, and society as a whole.

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Precarious Work in Comparative Perspective
Call for Papers for Stream at the 2018 International Labour Process Conference (ILPC)

Stream Organizers:
Arne L. Kalleberg (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and
Steven P. Vallas (Northeastern University)

This stream focuses on theory, research and policy regarding precarious work in both advanced capitalist and developing countries. By precarious work, we mean work that is uncertain, insecure and in which risks are shifted from employers and governments to workers. For the majority of workers affected in advanced capitalist countries the expansion of precarious work represents a dramatic shift in the very logic that governs work under contemporary capitalism. For workers in developing countries, the growth of precarious work has created additional insecurity and uncertainty in the formal sector of their economies. Though these developments have been much studied, much remains unknown.

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EGOS 2018 – Tallinn, Estonia
Sub-theme 50: Inclusive Organizations and  Knowledge Workers’  Mobility

We would like to announce the sub-theme on Inclusive Organizations and Knowledge Workers’ Mobility that we convene with my colleagues from the Netherlands and Lithuania at the European Group of Organization Studies (EGOS) in Tallinn. The  conference takes place in Estonian capital on 5-7 July, 2018.

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