New Member Publication: Lemmon, Patterson and Martin on Mothers’ Time and Relationship with Adolescent Children

Congratulations to Megan Lemmon, Sarah E. Patterson and Molly A Martin on their new publication in the Journal of Family Issues.  OOW members may find the new article to be of interest:

Lemmon, Megan, Patterson, Sarah E., and Molly A. Martin. Online First. Mothers’ Time and Relationship with their Adolescent Children: The Intersecting Influence of Family Structure and Maternal Labor Force Participation.  Journal of Family Issues.  

Job Posting: Postdoctoral Fellowships at Washington University in St. Louis

The Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government and Public Policy is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization at Washington University in St. Louis that combines academic research with public policy analyses. The Center’s unique leadership team is comprised of a leading political scientist, a renowned economist, and a prominent business leader. The Center was created in 1975 as the Center for the Study of American Business under the direction of Murray Weidenbaum and renamed in his honor in 2001. The mission of the Center is to serve as a bridge between policymakers and scholars by supporting scholarly research, public affairs programs, and other activities at the intersection of government and business — addressing some of the most important public policy issues facing America.

The Center is pleased to announce a new postdoctoral position to begin Summer of 2018.

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International Society for Justice Research Conference

The biennial conference of the International Society for Justice Research (https://www.isjr.org/) will be held July 25-28, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. The hosts (Emory University, in conjunction with Georgia State University and the University of Georgia) invite submissions. The theme, Interrogating Injustice, will highlight issues related to race and to the distribution of health care resources. Scholars from an array of disciplines whose work touches upon social justice concerns from both basic and applied perspectives are encouraged to submit their research for presentation as individual papers, posters, or paper symposia (that include 3-5 related papers from different scholars). Submissions close March 15, 2018. For submission and other conference details (e.g., registration, accommodations, travel), please visit http://sociology.emory.edu/isjr2018.

How work ethnographers are adapting to the changing nature of work

As part of our March newsletter, Benjamin Snyder comments on how ethnographers of work are responding to changes in the character of labor and employment.  Snyder is the author of The Disrupted Workplace (Oxford University Press, 2016) and a Lecturer in Sociology & Social Policy at Victoria University of Wellington.  He will join the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Williams College in Fall 2018.  

In 2001, Stephen Barley and Gideon Kunda called upon organizational and work sociologists to revisit the field’s core concepts. Time, place, schedule, wage, job, career, employment, management, ownership, head versus hand, work versus leisure, and a host of other taken for granted ways of describing economic life under bureaucratic organizing, they argued, are increasingly obscured by new post-industrial forms. They prescribed a return to an older tradition of detailed ethnographic studies of work and workplaces to adapt to the changing times. Sit with working people. Watch what they do. Listen to what work means to them. Build new concepts. For ethnographically inclined sociologists of my generation, for whom this call was part of our introduction to the field in graduate school, this message felt like a warm welcome. Many of us took up the invitation. When I look out on the field now, almost two decades later, I get the sense that the seed Barley and Kunda planted has begun to bear fruit. Work-oriented ethnographers are deeply engaged in this much needed conceptual reconstruction.

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Postdoctoral Fellow on a Project about Responding to Crises in Science with New Models of Practice and Organization

Application review begins March 15, 2018

 The Institute for Society and Genetics (ISG) at the University of California at Los Angeles (www.socgen.ucla.edu), invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow position beginning July 1, 2018.  The Institute for Society and Genetics, housed in the Division of Life Sciences at UCLA, is an interdisciplinary research and teaching unit focused on issues at the intersection of biology and society.  The successful candidate will work with Drs. Aaron Panofsky and Christopher Kelty on an NSF funded project (Grant # 1734683) about the dynamics and implications of recent projects, organizations, and reforms seeking to improve the robustness and reliability of biomedical and behavioral science by tracing examples of contemporary controversies surrounding, for example, the reproducibility crisis, post-publication peer review, “predatory” publishing. The postdoctoral fellow will support the PIs by conducting interviews and participant observation, collection and management of textual materials, the management of student researchers, data analysis, and write up of results.

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Call for Applications: 8th Berlin Summer School in Social Science

Berlin Summer School in Social Science 
Linking Theory and Empirical Research
Berlin, July 16 – 26, 2018

 

We are delighted to announce the 8th Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences. The summer school aims at supporting young researchers by strengthening their ability in linking theory and empirical research. The two-week program creates an excellent basis for the development of their current research designs.

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