Call for Papers: Wharton Conference on Migration, Organizations, and Management

The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

May 30-31, 2019

Organizers:

  • Prithwiraj Choudhury, Harvard Business School
  • Exequiel Hernandez, The Wharton School
  • Elena Kulchina, Duke University
  • Dan Wang, Columbia University

Migration, or the movement of people across national borders for either permanent or temporary settlement, is one of the defining issues of our time. Despite its importance, migration has not been emphasized in the study of management and organizations. Existing research from other disciplines has focused on “macro” or policy issues. For instance, many studies explore whether low-skill immigrants affect the employment and wages of native workers (Card, 1990; Borjas, 1994; Peri and Sparber, 2009). Other work focuses on how high-skill immigrants create clusters of knowledge and entrepreneurship at the regional or national level (Saxenian, 2006; Kerr, 2019). Yet other research focuses on the role migration plays in cross-border trade and investment (Gould, 1994; Leblang, 2010). These precedents suggest that migration is an important factor affecting the mobility of labor, knowledge, and capital – i.e., the very resources upon which organizations and their managers rely to survive, grow, and innovate.

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Invited Essay: Corruption, Gender, And The Violation Of Public-Private Boundaries

Fauzia-Husain
Fauzia Husain

As part of our January newsletter, Fauzia Husain contributes a piece on what corruption studies can teach us about the flow of power in organizations, informed by her research in Pakistan. Fauzia Husain is a PhD candidate at the University of Virginia. Her work explores the local and global dynamics of gender, agency and power through a focus on state security. She is also one of the organizers of JTS 2019. 

Over the years several studies have shown gender and corruption to be related, with rates of corruption falling as women’s participation in government rises. Some scholars assume that this relationship is based on gendered traits. Corruption, they argue, is gendered because women are more prone to honesty and good civic sense. Others suggest that not essential gender traits but systemic factors explain the relationship between gender and corruption—it is liberal democracy that explains both, gender integration as well as honest government. In the course of fieldwork with women police in Pakistan, however, I found that the gendered character of corruption might be the outcome not of quantity or propensity but of opportunity and quality. In other words, both men and women do corruption, they just do it differently.

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Call for Papers: Special Issue of Socio-Economic Review

Call for Papers: “Understanding the Platform Economy: Socio-Economic Dynamics in new Digital Markets” (Special Issue of Socio-Economic Review)

Guest Editors

  • Elke Schüßler (Johannes Kepler University Linz)
  • Juliet Schor (Boston College)
  • Stefan Kirchner (Technical University Berlin)
  • William Attwood-Charles (Boston College)

Timeline

Papers can be submitted immediately, but no later than 15 March, 2019. The targeted publication of the special issue is the July 2020 issue of Socio-Economic Review.

Background

The rise of digital platforms challenges traditional approaches to the organization of markets, work, and consumption and suggests a new economic era some have called the “platform economy.” The aim of this Special Issue is to better understand the socio-economic dynamics structuring the platform economy, with a focus on new “sharing” and gig labor platforms.

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Call for Papers: “Formal Organization Today” EGOS Colloquium Sub-theme

European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS)

35th EGOS Colloquium

“Formal Organization Today: Reconnecting with the Classics” (sub-theme 45)

Edinburgh (UK), 4-6 July 2019

Convenors:

Call for Papers

Concepts and discussions on classic organizational authors currently seem to be relegated to the pages of manuals and history books (Adler, 2009). In particular, formal organizational dynamics (e.g., bureaucracy, staff-line relations, work formalization) occupy a secondary role in the current literature (du Gay & Vikkelsø, 2016). Most contemporary studies explore societal matters, work interactions, and new organizational forms, while leaving formal organizational aspects — which were once core in our discipline — in the background. In part, this state of affairs is due to the development of the field which has been enriched by new themes and approaches (Lounsbury & Beckman, 2015). Yet, we also suffer from a ‘novelty bias’ and at times do not pause to explore how new ideas fit within the canons of our discipline (Barley, 2015).

The goal of this sub-theme is to stimulate an appraisal for our fundamental object of inquiry: formal organizations.

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Call for Papers: Organization Science Winter Conference

Call for Papers: Organization Science Winter Conference 2019

“The Disciplines and Organization Science”

Feb. 28 – March 2, 2019

Phoenix, Arizona

Co-Chairs

  • Anne Bowers, University of Toronto
  • Hillary Anger Elfenbein, Washington University
  • Brayden King, Northwestern University
  • Francisco Polidoro, University of Texas at Austin
  • Filippo Carlo Wezel, Università della Svizzera italiana (USI Lugano)

Organization science is an interdisciplinary endeavor, bringing together scholars who do “fundamental research about organizations, including their processes, structures, technologies, identities, capabilities, forms, and performance.” The history of the journal (and the broader field of organizational research) has strong links to other academic disciplines, including psychology and sociology. Psychology’s emphasis on individual behavior has informed research on the behavioral microfoundations of organizations, whereas sociological perspectives on society and institutions inform theories about the social context in which organizations operate.

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