Archive

Calls for Proposals

Applications due January 12, 2018

Application portal can be accessed starting November 15, 2018, at https://www-casbs.stanford.edu/local/application/summer-institute

SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENTISTS
Organizations and Their Effectiveness
July 9 through July 21, 2018
 
Directors
Robert Gibbons (rgibbons@mit.edu), economics and management, MIT
Woody Powell (woodyp@stanford.edu), education and sociology, Stanford University

ABOUT THE CASBS SUMMER INSTITUTE
The 2018 CASBS summer institute, Organizations and Their Effectiveness, will take place from July 9 through July 21, 2018, at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences on the Stanford University campus. Fourteen fellowships will be awarded to cover tuition, room and board, and travel.

The deadline for applications is January 12, 2018. Awards will be announced by email no later than February 9, 2018.

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Call for Abstracts for panel entitled, “Interpreting and questioning finance as social relationships” at the International Sociological Association’s World Congress next summer in Toronto, Canada, 15-21 July 2018.  This will be one of 23 sessions organized by the Economy & Society research committee (RC02).  Although the conference is next summer, the deadline for submitting abstracts is fast approaching:  September 30, 2017, 24:00 GMT.

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Dates and location:
Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) of the University of Mannheim on Friday, November 17 and Saturday, November 18, 2017.[1]

Theme:
Labor market and economic sociologists take notice of each other less often than common concerns might suggest. This ignorance is particularly troubling amid the large-scale influx of immigrants and refugees into established economies over the past few years in particular and the past decade in general. Among these changes, issues of employment and emergent economic activities, which both fields focus on, gain in significance and salience. Labor market sociologists demonstrate that unregulated labor markets are neither free nor fair, diminishing hopes for quick integration. A focus on the distribution of relevant worker characteristics over a range of social dimensions such as class, gender, and ethnicity allows labor market sociologists to develop more constructive views of labor market mechanisms. Economic sociologists scrutinize dynamics around the establishment of larger social objects such as industries and “informal economies”, some of which are dominated by immigrant ethnic groups. In more specific settings, economic sociologists have found evidence that ethnic diversity—an obvious consequence of migration—increases the resilience of common market mechanisms. The conference seeks to foster a dialogue between the two views in order to develop conceptual, analytical, and empirical strategies that help us study and understand the forces undergirding the recent developments and their consequences.

Submission:
Name, title, and abstract (250 words)
Deadline: September 10, 2017 (LEMS2017@mzes.uni-mannheim.de)
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The Negotiating Agreement in Congress Research Grants are aimed at scholars who seek to understand the conditions under which political negotiation can be achieved (or not achieved) in Congress and other legislative arenas. The grants provide up to $10,000 of funding for each awardee, to be used for up to one year of research and writing. Applicants must have a PhD in hand by the application deadline and must hold an affiliation with a college or university based in the United States. For more information, please visit www.ssrc.org/nacg or contact us at democracy@ssrc.org.

The deadline for applications is September 15, 2017.

Dirty Work

A call for proposals for the Southern Labor Studies Association’s Biennial Meeting

Where: The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
When: May 17-19, 2018

The Southern Labor Studies Association invites academics, activists, archivists, and others to propose panels, roundtables, and workshops for our next conference, which will take place at the Richard B. Russell Library at the University of Georgia. The theme of the 2018 conference is “Dirty Work.” This topic encompasses southern industries (mining, timber, turpentine, farming, chicken processing, catfish, etc.); the service economy (trash collection, domestic service, nursing, food service, etc.); bound labor (slavery, indenture, and prison labor); as well as work deemed morally “dirty” – from sex work and drug-selling to policing and overseeing. Panels discussing public history, archival projects, teaching, oral history, activism, important works in progress, and digital history are welcome. Southern labor studies topics outside the “Dirty Work” rubric are welcome too. The SLSA defines southern labor and working class studies broadly. We welcome historical and contemporary topics, all relevant academic disciplines, non-academic participants, and regional as well as comparative and transnational approaches. Our hope is to assemble a broad and diverse set of participants on a wide range of subjects.

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Please find an interesting call for abstracts below:

Welcome to the third International Interdisciplinary Conference on Research on Work held 16-18 August 2017, in Turku Finland. The 2017 conference will look forward with the theme ‘Work and Labour in the Digital Future’.

The first conference on research on work, WORK2013, followed by the second conference, WORK2015 in Turku, Finland brought over 400 participants from all over the world with excellent keynote and paper sessions. WORK2017 will stand out with the interdisciplinary theme of digital future.

We cordially invite you to submit an individual abstract to existing streams (listed below). Submission for abstracts opens on the 15th of November at the webpage: http://www.WORK2017.fi.

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The ASA Rose Series in Sociology, a book series published by the Russell Sage Foundation, is seeking book proposals. The Rose Series publishes cutting-edge, highly visible, and accessible books that offer synthetic analyses of existing fields, challenge prevailing paradigms, and/or offer fresh views on enduring controversies. Books published in the Series reach a broad audience of sociologists, other social scientists, and policymakers.

Please submit a 1-page summary & CV to: Lee Clarke, rose.series@sociology.rutgers.edu.

For more information, visit http://www.asanet.org/research-publications/rose-series-sociology.