New Member Publication on Who Publishes in Leading Sociology Journals

OOW Section member, Carolyn Perrucci, has recently published a new journal article on publishing trends in sociological journals:

Robert Perrucci, Mangala Subramaniam and Carolyn C. Perrucci, “Who Publishes in Leading Sociology Journals, 1965-2010?” Pages 77- 86 in Earl Wright II and Thomas C. Calhoun (eds.), What To Expect and How to Respond: Distress and Success in Academia. Rowman and Littlefield: 2016.

Use the norm of reciprocity to get constructive feedback on your work

By Howard Aldrich

In popular fiction, authors are often portrayed as isolated and tortured souls, locked away in a garret apartment or in a cabin in the forest, producing their great works without benefit of human companionship. In reality, writing is an extremely social activity, highly dependent upon an individual’s network of family and friends. Peer networks play in a particularly important role in moving writing from solipsistic doodling to prose that others want to read. Let me suggest one way in which social relationships are critical: finding people willing to offer critically constructive feedback on the work.

When your draft is completed, how will you know what reception it will receive from the intended readers? When I talk to academic writers about this question, I point out that the most risky action an author can take is to submit to a journal a paper that no one else has yet read. Although it seems incredibly shortsighted, I often talk to people who’ve done exactly that – – they claim that they really couldn’t find anybody they thought would be a good reviewer. Thus, to get feedback on their work, they plunged ahead and sent it out for review.

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