Member Publications

Please check out the following recent publications from OOW members, Robert Perrucci and Carolyn C Perrucci, and collegaues.  

Robert Perrucci, Carolyn C. Perrucci, andMangala Subramaniam, “From Little Science to Big Science: Were Women andNon-Elites Left Out?” Archives ofPsychology, Volume 1, Issue 1, October 2017:41-45.

Carolyn C. Perrucci and Robert Perrucci, “NewEconomy,” in George Ritzer (ed.) WileyBlackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, 2nd Edition, April 2018.John Wiley & Sons: Oxford, UK.

Richard Hogan and Carolyn Cummings Perrucci, “WeKnow about Reagan, but Was There a Clinton Effect? Earnings by Race, Gender,Marital and Family Status, 1993 and 2000.” CriticalSociology (Online First) First Published October 4, 2018.

https://doi-org.exproxy.lib.purdue.edu/10.1177/0896920518798081

New Member Publication: Doering on Personal Ties in Microfinance

OOW members may be interested in this new publication from Laura Doering at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto:

Doering, Laura. 2018. “Risk, Returns and Relational Lending: Personal Ties in Microfinance.” American Journal of Sociology 123(5):1341–81.

Personal relationships often facilitate credit transactions. However, existing research holds different expectations about whether personal ties prove detrimental or beneficial for lenders. Economic sociology highlights the advantages lenders accrue when they have personal ties with borrowers. Yet research from social psychology suggests that personal ties can be costly because lenders may “escalate commitment” to poor performers. This study uses data from a microfinance bank to ask: When are personal relationships detrimental or beneficial for lenders? It shows that lenders with personal ties to borrowers are less likely to cut those ties and their borrowers miss fewer payments. However, these trends vary with frequency of contact. When lenders and borrowers interact infrequently, lenders continue to show strong commitment, but borrowers become less compliant, creating potential problems for lenders. This study integrates theories from economic sociology and social psychology to offer a more nuanced, temporally informed understanding of personal ties in finance.

New Member Publication: Lemmon, Patterson and Martin on Mothers’ Time and Relationship with Adolescent Children

Congratulations to Megan Lemmon, Sarah E. Patterson and Molly A Martin on their new publication in the Journal of Family Issues.  OOW members may find the new article to be of interest:

Lemmon, Megan, Patterson, Sarah E., and Molly A. Martin. Online First. Mothers’ Time and Relationship with their Adolescent Children: The Intersecting Influence of Family Structure and Maternal Labor Force Participation.  Journal of Family Issues.  

ILR Review Special Issue on Workplace Inequality

We’re pleased to announce the release of an ILR Review special issue on workplace inequality — offering important theoretical and practical insights for efforts to reduce inequality in organizations. Many thanks to guest editors Pamela S. Tolbert and Emilio J. Castilla.  Papers in the issue empirically examine the efficacy of a range of practices to reduce racial and gender disparities in hiring, promotion, and compensation.  They also identify key contingencies that affect the relationship between organizational practices and outcomes, showing differences in effects for women and minorities, for members at different hierarchical levels, and for members drawn from internal or external labor markets.

Rose Batt and Larry Kahn, Editors

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