Call for Papers: ESS Mini-Conference on Emotions and Work

Eastern Sociological Society Annual Conference 2019: Mini-Conference 
Emotions and Work
Boston, MA
 

This mini-conference aims to bring together scholars working on the emotional landscape of contemporary workplaces and workers. Under neoliberalism, work has become more insecure for workers across the board—even for elite workers who typically had enjoyed far more stable careers. What do these shifts mean for implicit and explicit emotional requirements from workers on the job? Furthermore, how do workers emotionally respond to an uncertain workforce? Emerging research suggests that all workers are now salespeople who must “sell” their personalities, above and beyond their skills and credentials, as they seek to advance in their careers. Emotions such as cheer, warmth, optimism, and passion are key in the workplace, include in decisions about hiring, promotion, and designating value to work.

This mini-conference will focus on how emotions matter in the contemporary workplace and for contemporary experiences of work. We are, broadly, interested in submissions that focus on emotions and work, drawing from any methodology. Below are just a few examples of the kinds of questions that papers in the conference could seek to address:   
Continue reading “Call for Papers: ESS Mini-Conference on Emotions and Work”

Call for Papers: The Second Global Carework Summit

The Second Global Carework Summit
June 9-11, 2019
Toronto, Ontario

The Carework Network is organizing a three-day conference to bring together carework researchers from across disciplines and across the globe.

The Carework Network is an international organization of scholars and advocates who focus on the caring work of individuals, families, communities, paid caregivers, social service agencies and state bureaucracies. Care needs are shifting globally with changing demographics, disability movements, and climate change driven environmental crises. Our mission is to address critical issues related to carework, such as how identities influence carework; how inequality structures carework; how caring work is recognized and compensated; how state policies influence the distribution of care; working conditions of care; and whether and to what extent citizens have a right to receive, and a right to provide, care. Scholars and advocates working on issues related to elder care, child care, health care, social work, education, political theory of care, social reproduction, work/family, disability studies, careworker health and safety, and related issues are encouraged to submit proposals.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: The Second Global Carework Summit”

Call for Papers: Understanding the Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangements

RSF:The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences
Issue on New Developments in American Job Quality: Understanding the Recent Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangments

Edited by:
David R. Howell, The New School
Arne L. Kalleberg, University of North Carolina

The question of job quality has emerged as a key challenge for researchers and policy-makers in the 21st century. The growing realization that the quality, not just the quantity, of jobs is central to addressing a myriad of social and economic problems—such as economic development, family formation and social integration, poverty and inequality, and individual well-being—has put this age-old topic on the front burner for social scientists.

This issue of RSF will focus on two important dimensions of the quality of jobs created in the past three decades in the United States. First, there has been an expansion of low-wage jobs, a phenomenon that has been documented by numerous studies, many of which have been sponsored by the Russell Sage Foundation. This proliferation of low-wage work, especially among younger workers, has contributed to the weakening of the middle class, reversing the dramatic improvements experienced by the middle of the income distribution in the three decades following World War II.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Understanding the Rise of Low-Wage Jobs and Nonstandard Work Arrangements”

Call for papers: Special Issue on Professionalism in a Globalising World

Call for papers: CAMBIO. RIVISTA SULLE TRASFORMAZIONI SOCIALI, December 2018
Special issue on Varieties of Professionalism in a Globalising World: New Theoretical Perspectives and Analytical Approaches
https://www.researchgate.net/project/Varieties-of-Professionalism-in-a-Globalising-World

The sociology of professions is at a crossroads. Dealing with multiple complexities, an update of its theoretical and conceptual tools seems necessary. The rise of the knowledge society has led to a new division of labour (see Machlup 1962; Drucker 1968; and Bell 1973). From this perspective, the increasing number of professionals in all developed countries can be explained by both the emergence of new professions, as well as the expansion of more traditional ones. After all, these processes are associated with growing segmentation and stratification of professional labour markets (Brint 1994). Moreover, the economic crisis has induced an increase in the average level of workers’ qualification due to the growth of employment in advanced business services, while simultaneously it has led to a corresponding loss of low-skilled employment (Gallie 2013). Therefore, the dimension of expertise has gained new centrality, with the study of expert labour receiving renewed scholarly attention (see Muzio et al. 2008).

Continue reading “Call for papers: Special Issue on Professionalism in a Globalising World”

Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment

Critical Practice in an Age of Complexity

Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment. Conference
Place: University of Arizona, Tucson
Dates: 22 – 23 February 2018
Abstract Deadline: 05 Dec 2017
http://architecturemps.com/arizona/

Context:
Donald Trump promises investment in infrastructure, China continues to urbanize, global cities are surrounded by slums and housing is unaffordable while simultaneously a form of capital investment.

The issues of living in the United States cities, towns and communities are more than just questions of the buildings we construct; the houses we make or the roads we build. The built environment reflects and informs social development, community conflict and economic opportunity, demographic disparity and more. To understand this complex relationship we need to think across discipline boundaries.

Disciplines:
Sociology, human geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning and more.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Socio-cultural critiques of the built environment”

Socius Call for Papers

Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World invites papers for a special issue on gender in the 2016 elections. We invite contributions on all topics relevant to gender and politics. Potential topics could include (but are not limited to): gender and the executive; women, social policy, and state legislative elections; intersectionality and the media; gender and public opinion; and women in changing political institutions. Informative papers on trends or cross-national comparisons are welcome as long as they are framed in relation to the 2016 U.S. election.

The issue is scheduled to be published Spring 2017. The deadline for manuscript submissions is January 15, 2017. To submit a manuscript, go to http://srd.sagepub.com/ and follow the instructions provided. Clearly state in your cover letter that the manuscript is for consideration in the 2016 election special issue. All submissions will be peer reviewed per normal Socius practice. Questions about the special issue can be directed to the guest editors, Pam Paxton, at ppaxton@prc.utexas.edu or Melanie Hughes, at hughesm@pitt.edu.

Continue reading “Socius Call for Papers”

Call for Papers: Working Class Studies Association 2017

Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
May 31 – June 3, 2017

Our conference theme, “Class Struggle: Race, Gender, and Revolution,” seeks to take stock of the legacy, present, and future possibilities of the idea of “class struggle.” We invite proposals for individual papers, panels, plenary sessions, or cultural events that will investigate the myriad ways in which the working classes can fight for emancipation. In particular, the program committee seeks proposals that offer creative interrogations of the very concepts of “working class” and “class struggle” in today’s moment of global capitalism and the consequent disarticulation of traditional notions of the working class. What does working class mean in an era of deindustrialization, precarious work, and predatory capital mobility? What new sites of working-class struggle can come to the fore with the weakening of trade unions and the erosion of the shop-floor and public space as places of working-class organization and contestation?

Continue reading “Call for Papers: Working Class Studies Association 2017”