Youth and the Great Recession – are values, achievement orientation and health affected?

Ingrid Schoon and Jeylan Mortimer, Guest Editors

The recent global economic downturn has undermined employment prospects for young people and is likely to also undermine youth confidence, self perceptions, values, health, and outlook to the future. Increasing uncertainty about the future may especially affect young people who study towards or recently received an educational degree. How do young people navigate and respond to changing education and employment conditions, and how do they see their futures in times of economic instability? Initial evidence indicatesthat recessionary times undermine confidence in society and its institutions, yet the same effect is not necessarily apparent regarding achievement orientations, self concepts and health outcomes, at least in the immediate aftermath of the recession. Furthermore, there are great variations in adjustment between countries, suggesting that there might be country-specific pre-existing trends that have to be taken into account to understand the impact of the recession on young people. The question is whether confidence in societal institutionsis indeed more responsive to current events, while achievement orientations, health and other outcomes are more enduring, carrying over from more prosperous to more difficult times.

The Special Section aims to bring together contemporary evidence on how events at the macro level cascade down to individual level experiences, and to provide new insights into the impact of the recession on young people’s evaluation of their situation in different countries characterised by distinct welfare regimes and economic circumstances. Studies may comprise quantitative and qualitative empirical studies of data gathered before and after the 2008 Great Recession, including work and family values, career goals, self concepts, the perceived likelihood of realizing one’s goals in the future, mental health or physical health. The studies should address circumstances in the wider socio-economic context and include objective markers of economic hardship, information regarding concurrent welfare systems and assessment of individual level experiences. Bringing together evidence from different countries will facilitate a comparison of similarities and differences in the consequences of economic difficulties for young people. Identification of generalizable patterns across countries as well as differences in experiences due to country specific scenarios has the potential to inform ameliorative public policies.

Researchers interested in submitting an article to the Special Section should submit a letter of intent via email to Ingrid Schoon (I.Schoon@ioe.ac.uk) and Jeylan Mortimer (morti002@umn.edu) no later than September 1, 2015. The letter should include the tentative title and an abstract of 500 words maximum (including a short theoretical statement, sample description, preliminary results, and a sentence about the importance of the study for the field). The letters will be reviewed by the section editors and potential contributors will be selected based on the originality of the research, overall diversity of topics, and fit to the general theme of the Special Section. Successful authors will be notified within two weeks and invited to submit first drafts of manuscripts by January 1, 2016. Manuscripts should be no longer than 6,000 words (including footnotes, references, tables, and figures, but excluding the abstract), have no more than 30 references, and include a 200-word abstract. All manuscripts will be subject to an external review process. For further questions concerning the Special Section, please contact Ingrid Schoon, (I.Schoon@ioe.ac.uk) and Jeylan Mortimer (morti002@umn.edu)

For further information concerning the International Journal of Psychology, visit the website at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291464-066X or contact the Editor-in-Chief, Rainer K. Silbereisen at rainer.silbereisen@uni-jena.de.

Revised Call for Papers:   Special Issue of Business & Society
Social Innovation: Insights from Institutional Theory
Please Note – new deadline for paper submissions:  December 1, 2015

Full description: http://bas.sagepub.com/site/includefiles/SocialInnovation.pdf

Guest editors: 
Frank de Bakker, VU University Amsterdam
Silvia Dorado, University of Rhode Island
Ignasi Marti, EMLYON Business School, OCE Research Center
Jakomijn van Wijk, Maastricht School of Management
Charlene Zietsma, Schulich School of Business, York University

Please join us on Friday, August 7 from 8:00am to 10:00am at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC for a Professional Development Workshop: Being There/Being Them: The Intersection of Organizational and Occupational Ethnography. Our panelists include: Steve Barley (Stanford University); Lisa Cohen (McGill University); Emily Heaphy (Boston University); and Gerardo Okhuysen (UC Irvine).

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The Work and Family Researchers Network (WFRN) is seeking applicants for 2016 Early Career Work and Family Fellowships. The goal of the program is to help promising young scholars establish career successes, as well as connect them to the WFRN community. Fifteen scholars will be selected for the program.  Fellows receive a one year membership in the WFRN, conference registration, and $500 to help defer expenses to attend the 2016 WFRN Conference (to be held June 23-25 in Washington DC). At the conference, special events will be targeted to serve interests of fellows, including networking opportunities with senior scholars and teaching/research workshops. In addition, fellows will be connected with one another in periodic encounters beyond the conference, intended to facilitate collaboration and peer-mentorship. To be eligible, candidates must have received their doctorate in 2013 or later and have yet to progress into tenured or secure senior level positions.  Eligibility is not restricted on the basis of national location. Information about the program and application materials can be found at https://workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/content/early-career-fellowship-program. The deadline for receipt of applications is September 15, 2015. Questions about the program can be addressed to the program director, Stephen Sweet at SSWEET@ITHACA.EDU.

A mini-symposium was on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century was recently published in Historical Materialism (Volume 23, Issue 1).  The mini-symposium consisted of the following:

Below are the OOW Section’s 2015 award recipients for outstanding scholarship in the areas of organizations, occupations, and/or work:
  • Max Weber Award (for best book):  Dan Clawson and Naomi Gerstel (both of University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Unequal Time: Gender, Class, and Family in Employment Schedules (Russell Sage Foundation).
    • An honorable mention was awarded to Nancy DiTomaso (Rutgers University), for The American Non-Dilemma: Racial Inequality Without Racism(also Russell Sage Foundation).
  • W. Richard Scott Award (for best article):  Andras Tilcsik (University of Toronto), “Imprint-Environment Fit and Performance: How Organizational Munificence at Time-of-Hire Affects Subsequent Job Performance,” Administrative Science Quarterly, 2014, 59: 639-668.
    • An honorable mention was awarded to Christina Mora (University of California, Berkeley), for “Cross-Field Effects and Ethnic Classification: The Institutionalization of Hispanic Panethnicity, 1965 to 1990,” American Sociological Review, 2014, 79: 183-210.
  • James D. Thompson Award (for best paper by a graduate student):  Brad R. Fulton (Duke University), “Bridging and Bonding: How Social Diversity Influences Organizational Performance.”

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