Calls for Papers


Careers, Care, and Life-Course “Fit:” Implications for Health, Equality, and Policy

June 23-25, 2016 (June 22, 2016 Pre-Conference Policy Day)
Capital Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., USA

The Work and Family Researchers Network (WFRN) invites submissions for the 2016 Conference, Careers, Care, and Life-Course “Fit:” Implications for Health, Equality, and Policy, to be held June 23-25, 2016 at the Capital Hilton in Washington, D.C. The Work and Family Researchers Network is an international membership organization of interdisciplinary work and family researchers. We seek fresh and innovative scientific contributions on work and family issues from investigators in diverse disciplines, and we value all disciplinary perspectives on the issues. The voices of all stakeholders are needed to understand and address work and family issues to advance knowledge and practice. We also encourage policy advocates, policy makers, and work-life practitioners to submit evidence-based contributions. Continuing at the 2016 conference will be a practitioner “track” in an effort to encourage practitioner and policy-oriented submissions and promotion of researcher and practitioner/policy maker collaboration. There will also be a preconference Congressional briefing (“Policy Day”) on June 22.

Read more about the Call for Papers here .

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Human Relations

Special Issue Call for Papers: Conceptualising flexible careers across the life course

Guest Editors: Jennifer Tomlinson (University of Leeds, UK; Marian Baird (University of Sydney, Australia); Peter Berg (Michigan State University, USA); Rae Cooper (University of Sydney, Australia)

Read the full call for papers here: humanrelations/special_issues/ Flexible%20careers.html

Submission deadline: 1st March 2016; please do not submit papers before 1st February 2016

In recent years, much literature and research on the quality of working lives focuses on jobs as the unit of analysis, emphasizing job quality and flexibility. Through this call, we seek to shift the focus to careers and, in particular, develop the construct of a ‘flexible career’ drawing attention to the fact that work occurs over time in sequence and trajectory. We are interested in the conditions under which flexible and sustainable careers can develop and flourish. Given this perspective, the overarching objective of this special issue is to encourage new analytical approaches to studying the concepts and intersection of flexibility and careers. More specifically, it is to provide a space to examine the meaning of flexible careers from different disciplinary perspectives and to question the extent to which careers can be forged and maintained at different points across the life course in the current social and economic context. In doing so, we focus on what is perhaps the one of the greatest tensions in contemporary labour markets and societies: how to combine the social and economic need for individual life-long work opportunity, accomplishment and development (careers) with the need for a workforce able to continuously adjustment to the supply and demand for labour in space, time and function (flexibility).

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Section members may be interested in the announcement of the Leadership Excellence and Gender Symposium, hosted by the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University on March 28-30, 2016.

This is the Inaugural Leader Excellence Research Symposium organized by the Susan Bulkeley Butler Center for Leadership Excellence and the Krannert School of Management, among other partners.

The purpose of this symposium is to highlight cutting edge research and evidence-based practice regarding the creation and sustainment of
work–especially within the context of organizational, managerial, and occupational environments–that supports gender equality, leader excellence
and career success in organizations. More details regarding this interdisciplinary symposium can be found at:

On the link above, you will find a call for abstracts, for which the deadline is November 15th, 2015 (though earlier submissions are encouraged,
as space will be limited). Students and faculty from organizational behavior and theory, sociology, human resource management, psychology, economics, industrial relations, science, engineering, technology, strategy, education, political science, women’s studies, public health, communications, and all other disciplines which share a common research interest in gender and the workplace are invited to submit an abstract for consideration. Instructions for abstract submission can be found in the symposium link above.

Call for Papers: Gender and Work

2016 Annual Meeting of the Eastern Sociological Society
The Boston Park Plaza Hotel and Towers
Boston, MA
March 17-21, 2016

Gender plays a profound role in the way in which we all experience everyday life. Work, a major facet of society, is deeply affected by gender. While the wage gap between men and women has decreased over the past several decades, it persists nonetheless. This session is looking for research that examine gender disparities in both unpaid and paid work and how these disparities affect everyone’s lives (regardless of gender) and society at large. Papers that focus on uncovering issues such as wage gap, traditional gender roles, and gendered jobs are encouraged. Please submit abstracts (not longer than 250 words) to Deniz Yucel  ( Deadline for abstract submission: October 25, 2015.

Greetings! In anticipation of this year’s ASA meeting, we at the Cultural Sociology Working Papers Series would like to reissue our call for papers. Conference papers are especially welcome.

Cultural sociology has seen a remarkable efflorescence in the last decade. Scholars in the field have reinvigorated meaning-centered analysis in the discipline, studying topics as diverse as economic behavior, political processes, social movements, media, art, and architecture. Their studies have similarly ranged from focusing on macro level historical processes to investigating local level interaction patterns, with an eye towards the variable ways in which culture shapes them. Their joint premise is that, because culture is entwined in all aspects of social life, it cannot be dismissed as the side-product of underlying economic or political forces and must be understood on its own terms. With the growing diversity of this field, it becomes increasingly important for cultural sociologists to exchange ideas and to share their work at various stages of development.

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