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Calls for Papers

Youth and the Great Recession – are values, achievement orientation and health affected?

Ingrid Schoon and Jeylan Mortimer, Guest Editors

The recent global economic downturn has undermined employment prospects for young people and is likely to also undermine youth confidence, self perceptions, values, health, and outlook to the future. Increasing uncertainty about the future may especially affect young people who study towards or recently received an educational degree. How do young people navigate and respond to changing education and employment conditions, and how do they see their futures in times of economic instability? Initial evidence indicatesthat recessionary times undermine confidence in society and its institutions, yet the same effect is not necessarily apparent regarding achievement orientations, self concepts and health outcomes, at least in the immediate aftermath of the recession. Furthermore, there are great variations in adjustment between countries, suggesting that there might be country-specific pre-existing trends that have to be taken into account to understand the impact of the recession on young people. The question is whether confidence in societal institutionsis indeed more responsive to current events, while achievement orientations, health and other outcomes are more enduring, carrying over from more prosperous to more difficult times.

The Special Section aims to bring together contemporary evidence on how events at the macro level cascade down to individual level experiences, and to provide new insights into the impact of the recession on young people’s evaluation of their situation in different countries characterised by distinct welfare regimes and economic circumstances. Studies may comprise quantitative and qualitative empirical studies of data gathered before and after the 2008 Great Recession, including work and family values, career goals, self concepts, the perceived likelihood of realizing one’s goals in the future, mental health or physical health. The studies should address circumstances in the wider socio-economic context and include objective markers of economic hardship, information regarding concurrent welfare systems and assessment of individual level experiences. Bringing together evidence from different countries will facilitate a comparison of similarities and differences in the consequences of economic difficulties for young people. Identification of generalizable patterns across countries as well as differences in experiences due to country specific scenarios has the potential to inform ameliorative public policies.

Researchers interested in submitting an article to the Special Section should submit a letter of intent via email to Ingrid Schoon (I.Schoon@ioe.ac.uk) and Jeylan Mortimer (morti002@umn.edu) no later than September 1, 2015. The letter should include the tentative title and an abstract of 500 words maximum (including a short theoretical statement, sample description, preliminary results, and a sentence about the importance of the study for the field). The letters will be reviewed by the section editors and potential contributors will be selected based on the originality of the research, overall diversity of topics, and fit to the general theme of the Special Section. Successful authors will be notified within two weeks and invited to submit first drafts of manuscripts by January 1, 2016. Manuscripts should be no longer than 6,000 words (including footnotes, references, tables, and figures, but excluding the abstract), have no more than 30 references, and include a 200-word abstract. All manuscripts will be subject to an external review process. For further questions concerning the Special Section, please contact Ingrid Schoon, (I.Schoon@ioe.ac.uk) and Jeylan Mortimer (morti002@umn.edu)

For further information concerning the International Journal of Psychology, visit the website at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291464-066X or contact the Editor-in-Chief, Rainer K. Silbereisen at rainer.silbereisen@uni-jena.de.

Revised Call for Papers:   Special Issue of Business & Society
Social Innovation: Insights from Institutional Theory
Please Note – new deadline for paper submissions:  December 1, 2015

Full description: http://bas.sagepub.com/site/includefiles/SocialInnovation.pdf

Guest editors: 
Frank de Bakker, VU University Amsterdam
Silvia Dorado, University of Rhode Island
Ignasi Marti, EMLYON Business School, OCE Research Center
Jakomijn van Wijk, Maastricht School of Management
Charlene Zietsma, Schulich School of Business, York University

Research in the Sociology of Work has been a widely respected research annual since 1988.

Beginning in 2016,  RSW will appear twice annually, the better to represent the best and most provocative sociological thinking being done on work, organizations, and the employment relationship. Submissions are invited for possible inclusion in RSW volume 28, no. 2 (Fall, 2016). All manuscripts will be subject to peer review, with timely feedback provided to authors. Articles can address any of a wide range of topics and themes, including but not limited to the following:

  •  Control and Resistance at Work
  •  Precarious employment
  • “Dirty” Work
  • Work and Family
  • Knowledge Work
  •  “Diversity” Management
  • Intersectionality at Work
  • Work and Social Movements
  • Gender, Work, and Neo-liberalism
  • Work and the State
  • Emotional labor and Service Work
  • Sex work
  • Professional work
  • Immigrants at Work
  • Globalization and Work
  • New meanings of work

Articles intended for v. 28, no. 2 should be submitted no later than November 1, 2015. Queries and submissions should be sent to Steven Vallas at s.vallas@neu.edu

“Elites, Economy and Society: New Approaches and Findings”

Special Issue of Socio-Economic Review 

Timeline

Submission deadline: January 18, 2016

Publication of the special issue in the Socio-Economic Review: 2017

Background

Recent economic findings and global protest movements have brought increased scholarly attention to elites and the wealthy. While the economic position and material resources of elites relative to the rest of society, and their evolutions in the past decades, are now starting to be well documented (Piketty and Saez 2003, Piketty 2014), we still have an incomplete view of this group (Khan, 2012). This special issue of the Socio-Economic Review calls for papers that document and theorize the social, cultural and political dimensions of the economic elite and the contexts and consequences associated with their recent rise, with a particular focus on the various processes and mechanisms fostering inequality and privilege.

We know that elites control a greater share of the income and wealth than they did just a generation ago. But how did this happen, and what does it mean for the interplay of economy and society? One of the oldest traditions in elite research, network analysis, has recently suggested an “unraveling” of national social ties (Mizruchi 2013), while others show the increase of economic variance within the upper class itself (e.g., Godechot 2012) and ascent of a more and more global bourgeoisie. Yet considerably less research addresses the content of social ties among elites. What consequences do both the structure and content of these elite relations have on the current economic and social order?  This key issue may be addressed at different levels, including the social relations among the economic elites, between economic elites and those from other fractions of the field of power (Bourdieu 1996), and their relations with other social groups.

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Call for Papers: Special Issue of Social Psychology Quarterly. “Methodological Advances and Applications in Social Psychology”

As social psychologists work to advance theory, they often are limited by their methodological toolbox. In response, researchers search for or develop new methodological approaches. Importantly, social psychologists have addressed this issue from both quantitative and qualitative orientations. Many theoretical questions also have motivated the growing use of mixed-methods. There has not been a “focused” outlet for these methodological developments within social psychology.

This special issue provides an outlet for showcasing new methodological approaches, share how methodologies commonly used in other disciplines can be adapted to social psychological investigations, and provide empirical examples of the application of new methods for social psychologists. The special issue will primarily include manuscripts that focus on the link between social psychological theory and methodological developments. As the focus is on methodological issues, the manuscripts would not include a lengthy theoretical development, but rather outline the theoretical issues at stake and why the methodological approach advances our empirical understanding of the theory. The special issue will also provide an outlet for research notes that demonstrate the use of a methodological technique to address a social psychological research question and would be shorter.

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Academic Entrepreneurship, and Knowledge and Technology Transfer: How do they relate to Research, Teaching, and Universities as Organizations?

April 11-12, 2016, University of Kassel, Germany

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Aldo Geuna (Torino), Walter W. Powell (Stanford)

Organized by: Guido Bünstorf, Georg Krücken, and Christian Schneijderberg

(International Centre for Higher Education Research, University of Kassel)

Spin-off entrepreneurship, patenting, licensing and other activities of knowledge and technology transfer from universities to the private sector have attracted considerable scholarly attention. A large number of studies from a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary backgrounds have investigated these activities. These prior efforts notwithstanding, important questions about academic entrepreneurship, commercialization and knowledge and technology transfer are still unanswered. This conference aims to help develop answers to these questions. In particular, contributions are invited that study how academic entrepreneurship, commercialization and transfer relate to research, teaching (including entrepreneurship education), as well as the nature and development of the university as an organization.

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To kindle interest in discovering contemporary worlds of work and occupations and in the hope of building more accurate and nuanced images of jobs, organizations, economies and people’s lives, the Academy of Management Discoveries announces a special issue devoted to the changing nature of work.

No one disputes that the structure of Western economies has shifted away from one based primarily on manufacturing to one increasingly dominated by services and the professions, broadly construed. Many also claim that the nature and structure of organizations, jobs, and careers have also changed substantially (e.g., Evans, Kunda, & Barley, 1994; Hall, 1996; Rousseau, 1997). As the author of a recent article in New York magazine noted: “The traditional compact between employers and employees is slowly fading away, and with it, a way of thinking, a way of living, a way of relating to others and regarding oneself that generally comes with a reasonably predictable professional life” (Senior, 2015:1). Yet, with a few exceptions. organizational scholars have paid surprisingly little attention to studying how work, occupations, and careers are changing (Barley and Kunda, 2001).

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